Sea urchin may hold key to carbon sequestration

02/5/2013 | Royal Society of Chemistry

The capture of carbon dioxide from power plants could be made practical and cost-effective, thanks to the sea urchin and the U.K. scientists who noted the role that nickel nanoparticles play in forming the urchin's exoskeleton. The mineralization process in the formation of this exoskeleton is considered the most reliable form of carbon dioxide storage, and nickel appears to be the key catalyst. However, some see this as only an incremental step in the capturing process. "True innovation ... should harness catalytic action in the conversion of CO2 to high value products, such as carbamates," said Mark Keane, a chemical engineering professor.

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