Study shows infection-control practices perceived as most effective

02/5/2013

A survey of infection-control specialists at 478 U.S. hospitals helped Michigan researchers create a list of the most common infection-control practices based on strength of evidence. The report in the American Journal of Infection Control found alcohol-based hand rub and aseptic urinary catheter insertion were among those perceived as the most effective practices, while routine central catheter changes and nitrofurazone-releasing urinary catheters were among the practices perceived as the least effective.

View Full Article in:

Nurse.com

Published in Brief:

SmartBrief Job Listings for Health Care

Job Title Company Location
Senior Director, Research
America's Health Insurance Plans (AHIP)
Washington, DC
Stop Loss Sales Executive
Blue Cross Blue Shield of MA
Boston, MA
Regional Director, Southeastern Region - State Affairs
America's Health Insurance Plans (AHIP)
Washington, DC
Field Representative-Oklahoma and Kansas
National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA)
Multiple Locations, SL_Multiple Locations
Market Intelligence Manager
Olympus Corporation of the Americas
Southborough, MA