Consider students' interests, real-world scenarios when creating history lessons

04/13/2014 | MiddleWeb

Understanding how history relates to everyday life is not always clear to adolescent students, but middle-school social studies teacher Aaron Brock writes that ensuring real-world activities are in sync with their interests can make past events more meaningful to them. In this blog post, Brock explains how his classes completed a First Amendment exercise in which they created a petition -- a link to a sample petition is available -- that represented their interests and presented the petition to administrators.

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