Octopuses stay untangled with skin repellant, researchers say

05/16/2014 | Discovery

You never see octopuses tie themselves up in knots because the creatures' skin repels itself, researchers say. "The results so far show, and for the first time, that the skin of the octopus prevents octopus arms from attaching to each other or to themselves in a reflexive manner. The drastic reduction in the response to the skin crude extract suggests that a specific chemical signal in the skin mediates the inhibition of sucker grabbing," scientists at Hebrew University of Jerusalem wrote in their study, published in Current Biology.

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