Animal breeding programs could put wild populations at risk

05/23/2013 | ABC (Australia)

Brush-tail wallabies reared in captivity as part of a breeding program harbored gastrointestinal bacteria resistant to crucial veterinary antibiotics including streptomycin, spectinomycin and trimethopim, according to recent research. The captive-bred wallabies did not receive antibiotic treatment, according to lead author Michelle Power, so it's likely that feed and water were the source of exposure. Transmission of genetic material from the antibiotic-resistant pathogens poses risks to wild wallabies and has implications for zoonotic diseases.

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