Lone crystal shows signs of interface superconductivity, report suggests

09/25/2013 | Nature (free content)

Researchers have found that an iron-based crystal may have regions that can superconduct at temperatures that are higher than the rest of the crystal. Physicist Paul Chu of the University of Houston reports small regions of an iron-based crystal that generally superconducts at 30 kelvin can superconduct at 49 kelvin, which could be the first time interface superconductivity was detected in a stand-alone and stable crystal.

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