HR & Career
Top stories summarized by our editors
7/19/2018

If you face the prospect of a major career change, it is important to remain positive and in control, writes Digital Kangaroos CEO Sania Gupta. Remember the habits that have brought you success in the past and stay true to your passions, she writes.

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Entrepreneur online
7/19/2018

A company's culture is a key factor to consider when looking for a job, David Jensen writes. You can assess the culture in a business by analyzing employees' expressions, available facilities and company policies.

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David Jensen
7/19/2018

If you are being scolded by a boss, there are ways to tactfully avoid blame, Kat Boogaard writes. Consider pointing out that you lacked crucial information and ask to discuss the issue at a team meeting.

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The Muse
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Kat Boogaard
7/19/2018

Salary is often less important than the opportunity to learn new things and build your reputation, Michael Arthur writes. "A successful job change will close one learning chapter in your career, and open another chapter," he writes.

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Forbes
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Michael Arthur
7/19/2018

Sending a thank-you note after an interview is crucial if you want to get the job, Jill Cornfield writes. Check for spelling and grammar mistakes, send notes to everyone involved in the interview and make sure the note's tone is formal.

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CNBC
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Jill Cornfield
7/19/2018

HR should consider state, federal and local laws when developing policies regarding employees' drug use, write Charlie Morgan and Christiane Nolton from Alston & Bird. "Employers will need to consider what substances to test for, including alcohol and marijuana in states that have legalized some form of use of the drug," they write.

7/19/2018

A study suggests HR can do a better job of anticipating talent and leadership-development needs by combining talent and strategic planning and rethinking how learning and training are offered, writes Evan Sinar, vice president at DDI. "By giving leaders access to the types and ways of learning they prefer, HR can boost its status by being an adviser and accelerator of leadership growth," Sinar writes.

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Evan Sinar
7/19/2018

Chief HR officers and chief information officers should be co-managing change initiatives, including moving to the cloud and other technological challenges of a global organization, writes Ann Blakely of Baker Tilly. "Both parties need to listen closely to the other, take a lot of notes and formulate a road map," she writes.

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CIOReview
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Baker Tilly
7/19/2018

Chief HR officers should approach the job like a CEO and align efforts to improve talent and workplace culture with business strategy, writes George Brooks of EY. "A strategic CHRO can foresee whether the business will face circumstances that impact the workforce or workplace, and then consider external or internal options," he writes.

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Forbes
7/19/2018

Instead of offering impersonal praise, leaders should ask employees how they did such a good job and show them how their work helps the organization, writes Ron Carucci, co-founder and managing partner at Navalent. "Whether they sacrificed time with family, took on the emotional toil of doing something new or bore the political risks of a highly visible project, let people know that you understand the toll it took," he writes.

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Ron Carucci, Navalent