HR & Career
Top stories summarized by our editors
11/16/2017

The best way to manage morale during layoffs is to be honest and upfront about the situation and help the employees find new jobs, executives say. After the layoffs, engage remaining employees by giving them career training and a bigger role in making decisions.

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Workforce
11/16/2017

Leaders do a better job when they have the skills and experience specific to the business they're in, writes Art Markman. "[W]hen we train people to take on leadership roles, we need to give them practice solving domain-specific problems so that they can prepare to integrate information in the arena in which they are being asked to lead," he writes.

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Art Markman
11/16/2017

Motivate employees by showing them how their efforts will benefit them personally, writes Margo Manning, author of "The Step-Up Mindset for New Managers." Meet with the workers individually to figure out what inspires them and make sure they end up reaping the rewards.

11/16/2017

Full-time and part-time employees with diabetes cost US employers $20.4 billion annually through unplanned missed workdays, according to a report released by Gallup and Sharecare to coincide with World Diabetes Day this week. Sharecare Vice President Sheila Holcomb said employers can partner with the medical community to offer diabetes education and training for employees.

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Sharecare, Gallup
11/15/2017

Male recruiters admit a candidate's looks and attire influence hiring decisions, while female recruiters say they care more about education and references, according to a Jobvite report. The report also lists deal breakers, with 86% of recruiters citing rudeness to a receptionist or support staff, 71% citing phone use during an interview and 52% citing bad hygiene.

11/15/2017

Immediately validate co-workers' concerns when they voice frustrations to you, Jaclyn Westlake writes. If you empathize with others before responding, they're more likely to understand your point of view without feeling resentful.

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The Muse
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Jaclyn Westlake
11/15/2017

Dress more formally than you need to and chat up high-level executives whenever possible to secure a prosperous future at work, writes Shana Lebowitz. Take every opportunity to speak up in meetings and use the end of each workday to reflect upon what you've accomplished.

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Business Insider
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Shana Lebowitz
11/15/2017

If you're struggling with being open-minded about a situation at work, try talking to an impartial person who can help you comprehend the other side of the conversation, suggests John Brown. This strategy can also provide insight into why you may be resisting a particular change.

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Fast Company online
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John Brown
11/15/2017

Avoid applying for multiple positions at the same company simultaneously, because doing so will make you look desperate, writes Liz Ryan. Also, don't overemphasize how much you want the job or send a LinkedIn request to the hiring manager right after an interview.

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Forbes
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Liz Ryan, LinkedIn
11/15/2017

Exercise regularly to combat the strain and anxiety people often feel during the holidays, Jane Burnett writes. Also, maintain a personal to-do list that's separate from your work-related tasks.

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Ladders
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Jane Burnett