Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
1/19/2017

Looking at advertising in trade magazines offers insight into what films and actors are gunning for an Oscar nomination, writes Walt Hickey. "Name recognition, positive exposures, press-the-flesh meetings -- the dark arts of the campaign trail work, and work well, in this setting and others," he writes.

Full Story:
FiveThirtyEight
More Summaries:
Oscar, Walt Hickey
1/19/2017

Great leaders separate themselves from the pack through honesty, one component of which is humility, writes former FBI agent LaRae Quy. "It should not surprise anyone that studies have confirmed that business leaders from both large and small companies who possessed humility as a core trait were rated as more ethical and trustworthy than their counterparts, as well as able to elicit better employee engagement and job performance," she writes.

Full Story:
SmartBrief/Leadership
More Summaries:
LaRae Quy, FBI
1/19/2017

Thomas Merton and Muhammad Ali might not usually be grouped together, but each is honored in Louisville, Ky., for their transcendent appeals of faith and caring for all. "Neither man was elected to high office, but their messages in print, in words and in deeds reverberated across the globe and in the highest chambers of power," writes Lonnie Ali.

1/19/2017

The "gig economy" helps companies quickly hire workers to complete important tasks without the commitment of a full-time hire, explains Sarah Kessler. A host of apps, including Wonolo and Gigster, provide quick response rates for temporary workers and shoulder the management responsibilities so companies don't have to.

Full Story:
Quartz
More Summaries:
Sarah Kessler, Wonolo, Gigster
1/19/2017

Whatever the reason, people seem to find it difficult to admit they don't have all the answers, Lisa Kohn writes. Yet, for those who can admit they need help, getting "opinions, advice, and perspective" from smart people can lead to better and wiser decision-making.

Full Story:
LeadChangeGroup.com
More Summaries:
Lisa Kohn
1/19/2017

Criticism is part of the job, but it's most likely to be effective when it's specific, delivered in a neutral tone and considers the recipient's feedback preferences, writes Deborah Bright. "Early on, before your employees have a chance to do anything that requires criticism, ask them how they prefer to receive feedback," she writes.

More Summaries:
Deborah Bright
1/19/2017

Brian Philips battled cancer while serving as CEO of FedEx Office, which may be why he says, "In crisis situations, take a breath and slow things down."

More Summaries:
FedEx Office, Brian Philips, CEO
1/19/2017

Harvard University provided an accurate voter list to organizers attempting to form a union of research and teaching assistants, university officials said in a filing this week with the National Labor Relations Board. Abhinav Reddy, an organizer with the Harvard Graduate Students Union-United Auto Workers, said "multiple inaccuracies within the voter list" marred the November election, which remains too close to call and which will be the subject of an NLRB hearing on Feb. 21.

Full Story:
The Harvard Crimson
1/19/2017

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 has been interpreted by courts as prohibiting discrimination based on sex stereotyping, but it does not expressly outlaw sexual-orientation discrimination -- a point opposed by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. On Friday, the US Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit will hear arguments in Christiansen v. Omnicom and consider whether Title VII protections should include a ban on sexual-orientation discrimination.

Full Story:
New York Law Journal
1/19/2017

A Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. lawsuit concerning the sale of mortgage-backed securities should not have been dismissed, the US Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit has ruled. The lawsuit alleges that five banks violated federal law in the sale of $140.5 million in MBS prior to the financial crisis.

Full Story:
Reuters