Educational Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
5/25/2017

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos in testimony before Congress this week supported the administration's proposed education budget, which includes more than $9 billion in proposed cuts and seeks to direct more funding to school-choice programs. When asked about providing funding to private schools, DeVos maintained that such decisions would fall to states, rather than the federal government.

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Betsy DeVos, Congress
5/25/2017

Language arts teacher Ariel Sacks in this blog post shares a poetry lesson that offers insight into her students' concerns about the future. Sacks created a poetry-writing station in which students used books to predict the future and revealed questions around subjects such as life on Mars, maintaining old customs and the end of the world.

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Ariel Sacks
5/25/2017

Some education experts say having key positions still vacant in the US Education Department could affect the process of approving and revising states' Every Student Succeeds Act plans. A department spokeswoman said the vacancies are not expected to affect the process, but Michael Petrilli, president of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, noted that the department has "fewer people to deal with the issues that come up."

5/25/2017

College and university leaders should only look to hire outside talent after conducting a thorough internal search, Christopher Gearin, president of Hickey College in Missouri, and Rodney Gee, interim director of human resources for Harris-Stowe State University, assert in this commentary. Leaders also should develop programs to foster the advancement of in-house talent, they recommend.

5/25/2017

Sixth-graders at an Oregon school built solar-powered stoves out of cardboard and foil as part of a cross-disciplinary project that incorporated science, math, social studies and writing skills. Students also learned about the need for such devices in refugee camps and wrote grant proposals to seek funding to donate one.

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Oregon school
5/25/2017

As Auburn University President Jay Gogue prepares to retire next month, he's being praised for his work increasing shared governance, boosting the graduation rate and making tough choices to save money. Gogue, who has served since 2007, says it's "the little stuff" that matters, such as listening to concerns of students, staff and faculty before implementing plans.

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Auburn University
5/24/2017

Professionals should consider their motivation before agreeing to take on extra work, including whether they are passionate about the duties to be performed or are more motivated by financial benefits, writes Regan Walsh. The most important consideration of all may be whether the option to turn down the extra work even exists, Walsh writes.

5/24/2017

North Carolina Surry County Schools Superintendent Travis Reeves credits a focus on "research-based teaching and learning strategies" for the success of the region's schools. He says the work being done by teachers and staff helped him win recognition as one of this year's regional superintendents of the year.

5/24/2017

Arrogance is a common defense mechanism when people feel insecure or rejected, writes Ted Leonhardt. Look to identify what that underlying insecurity is, self-correct and work to control it going forward.

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Fast Company online
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Ted Leonhardt
5/24/2017

Indiana education officials say the ILEARN testing program, which replaces the ISTEP exam, will be ready by spring 2019. State Superintendent Jennifer McCormick says the test should be shorter and that officials are hoping for a quicker turnaround time on scoring so results are more useful to educators.