Health IT News
Top stories summarized by our editors
6/14/2018

The growing importance of health care interoperability should prompt providers to focus on shifting federal regulations and the increasing use of artificial intelligence, writes Elizabeth Snell. Providers should also look at expanding interoperability networks and increasing options for patient data access amid the shift to value-based care, Snell writes.

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EHR Intelligence
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Elizabeth Snell
6/14/2018

Hospital CIOs should ensure that IT departments are involved in planning and strategy discussions, work to align workplace cultures, review and revise current workflows, involve vendors to support system migration, and rapidly but carefully choose an approach to address changes in IT systems in the event of a merger or acquisition, experts say. Quicker system integration would help consolidated organizations see savings and better outcomes earlier, says Daniel Barchi, CIO and senior vice president at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital.

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New York-Presbyterian
6/13/2018

Some health care delivery organizations and vendors said between 100 and 1,000 patients experienced adverse events from compromised medical devices, according to a University of California Cyber Team survey. Researchers also found that 80% of respondents reported risks associated with hacked medical devices, a higher number than reported by the FDA.

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Healthcare IT News
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FDA
6/13/2018

A HIPAA Journal report said that in the first quarter of this year, paper or films containing protected health information were the main location of PHI breached by hackers, followed by emails, network servers and laptops. EMRs, desktop computers and other portable electronic devices were also among hackers' top targets.

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Becker's ASC Review
6/13/2018

Scientists are developing and testing innovative treatments for cancers, heart defects, blindness, infectious peritonitis and many other diseases that affect dogs and cats as well as humans, yet about half of Americans say they are against research involving animals, writes Matthew R. Bailey, president of the Foundation for Biomedical Research. "Such innovative research saves and improves animals' lives -- and can lead to treatments for humans down the road," he writes.

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The Washington Times
6/13/2018

Researchers including MIT neuroscience professor Guoping Feng have been traveling to China to study non-human primate models of autism. Scientists use CRISPR gene editing technology to create Shank3 knockout macaques, and Feng has talked with scientists at the Oregon National Primate Research Center about performing similar research in the US.

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The Atlantic
6/13/2018

The NIH has allocated $7 million to fund two new genome research centers: one for testing genome editing technologies in pigs and another for testing in non-human primates. Researchers will develop methods and protocols for evaluating safety and effects in target cells and tissues and will share the resulting knowledge, methods and tools with the scientific community.

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NIH
6/12/2018

An Accenture report showed that 53% of surveyed C-suite executives from 100 health care organizations have plans to invest in artificial intelligence systems, while 86% have not yet invested in capabilities to verify data sources. Eighty-one percent of respondents reported being unprepared for any potential liability and social issues related to AI-based decisions, while 73% are planning to create AI-related ethical standards within their organizations, the report found.

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Accenture
6/12/2018

Automation can help improve the ordering process within EHR systems for physicians and enrich EHRs, leading to enhanced patient care and reduced physician frustration, writes Josh Gluck, a vice president at Pure Storage. Gluck notes that automation is also used to adjust staffing in health systems and generate bills more quickly.

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HealthTech
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Josh Gluck, Pure Storage
6/12/2018

The CMS on Monday unveiled guidance on how states can use federal Medicaid funding to support health information technology efforts including telemedicine programs, EHR systems and prescription monitoring tools to combat the opioid abuse crisis. Another CMS guidance, released the same day, details how Medicaid funding can be leveraged in designing treatment approaches for infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome.