News for Providers
Top stories summarized by our editors
5/25/2018

Researchers estimated that the US lifetime economic burden from child sex abuse reached nearly $9.3 billion in 2015, $8.6 billion of which was for female victims, while productivity losses accounted for $6.8 billion. The findings in the journal Child Abuse & Neglect also showed that childhood health care costs accounted for $580 million and adult medical costs for $399 million.

5/25/2018

A study in JAMA Oncology found a 20% reduction in dietary fat intake and an increase in the consumption of fruits and vegetables among women who were diagnosed with breast cancer was associated with a greater 10-year survival rate compared with usual diets. The findings were based on a clinical trial involving about 50,000 women.

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Medical News Today
5/25/2018

A 385,000-person study in The BMJ found severe eczema was associated with a 70% higher risk of heart failure, up to 50% increased risk of heart disease-related events and 20% greater risk of stroke. The study compared people with eczema and up to five controls each who did not have the condition.

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HealthDay News
5/25/2018

A study presented at the American Thoracic Society's annual conference found aspirin therapy was associated with an 18% lower risk of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The findings were based on 495 patients with COPD who were on aspirin therapy and 495 patients with the disease who were not on the therapy.

5/25/2018

Oregon began expanding access to costly hepatitis C treatments in January to include coverage for patients in the lower stages of fibrosis, according to Dana Hargunani, chief medical officer for the Oregon Health Authority. The state has one of the highest per capita hepatitis C mortality rates in the country.

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PBS
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Oregon Health Authority
5/25/2018

States that expanded their Medicaid programs as part of the Affordable Care Act had a 3.7% decrease in ICU admissions among Medicaid patients or those with no insurance, compared with states that did not expand their programs, researchers reported at the American Thoracic Society International Conference. Researcher Dr. Andrew Admon said the lower ICU admission rates may suggest that increased insurance coverage resulted in improvements in clinical outcomes, which could reduce hospital costs and strain on ICUs.

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MD Magazine online
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Medicaid, ICU
5/25/2018

A survey of 102 surgeons, oncologists, intensive care specialists and palliative care physicians found those with less than 40 hours of palliative care training were more likely to recommend major surgery over less aggressive treatments, researchers reported in the journal Surgery. "We've seen a significant proportion of patients who go to the emergency room or intensive care unit with terminal malignancy die in the ICU," said study coauthor Dr. Richard Bold.

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Reuters
5/25/2018

Oishei Children's Hospital in Buffalo, N.Y., has started using a new neonatal transport vehicle that has an automatic lift to raise wheeled isolettes, which weigh more than 300 pounds, into the vehicle, along with room for a fourth transport care team member. Neonatal nurse practitioner Katy Perry said the ambulance has a generator to keep an isolette operational during long trips through Western New York and beyond.

5/25/2018

Miami-Dade Animal Services officials and city of Hialeah, Fla., police raided an apartment where two people are accused of operating on animals, including an American bulldog that died a botched neutering procedure. One suspect remains at large; the other was arrested and charged with animal cruelty and practicing veterinary medicine without a license.

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WSVN-TV (Miami)
5/25/2018

Lingering winter conditions, a vitamin shortage and poor forage quality have made for an unusually high calf death rate across Canada's prairie, rising to 25% in at least one area, compared with an average of 2% or 3%. "Vitamin A and E were in short supply this year and the drought last year made that worse because now we don't have as much quality forage that would supply those vitamins," said veterinarian John Campbell.