News for Providers
Top stories summarized by our editors
8/20/2018

US data showed 59.6% of adults had two or more morbidities in 2013 to 2014, compared with 45.7% in 1988, while 91.8% of older adults had multiple morbidities, compared with 70.6% in 1988, researchers reported in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine. The analysis included 11 chronic conditions, including obesity.

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multiple morbidities
8/20/2018

The Partnership to Empower Physician-Led Care is holding a free webinar today from 3 to 4 p.m. EDT on proposed changes to the Medicare Shared Savings Program and how they could affect independent physicians and practices. The AAFP is a founding member of the PEPC.

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AAFP News
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AAFP
8/20/2018

Lehigh University researchers found that physicians and patients alike were dissatisfied with the use of EHRs, based on findings from a study in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association. Physicians conveyed less satisfaction with EHRs overall, saying they decreased productivity due to the time needed to input data and resulting workflow changes, while patients expressed being unsatisfied with EHRs due to disruptions they caused, which altered patients' perception of the care experience.

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Healthcare Finance
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Lehigh University
8/20/2018

Demographic trends are prompting long-term-care companies in the US to expand operations to China. "We deliberately kept our price point high because we wanted to make sure we have the right level of care for the seniors that we're seeking to move into our buildings," said Nate McLemore of Columbia Pacific Management.

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Skilled Nursing News
8/20/2018

Kaiser Family Foundation CEO Drew Altman says the US has too many people who are uninsured, but a lack of affordability presents a broader problem, affecting everyone. "If we want a measure that captures how people perceive the system when the number of uninsured is down and overall health spending has moderated, we need better ways of counting up the much larger share of the population who are having problems affording care," Altman says.

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Axios
8/20/2018

A study of more than 6,100 first-time mothers at 41 hospitals found those induced at 39 weeks had fewer complications and required fewer cesarean deliveries, with estimates that one cesarean could be avoided for every 28 women induced. The study, published in The New England Journal of Medicine, found 9% of induced women developed preeclampsia at the end of pregnancy versus 14% of those who were not induced, and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists have said offering induction is reasonable after thorough discussions of the options.

8/20/2018

A point-of-care immuno-chromatographic lateral-flow finger-stick assay tests pregnant women's blood for IgG and IgM antibodies related to the parasite Toxoplasma gondii. The maker is submitting the test for approval by the FDA.

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Medical Xpress
8/20/2018

Join maternal-fetal medicine specialists and administrative leads in MFM practices at the at the 2018 Practice Management Conference (previously called the AMFMM Annual Business Meeting) on Oct. 4-5, 2018, in Scottsdale, Ariz. Register before Aug. 31 to save $100. Learn more and register on the SMFM website.

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smfm.org
8/20/2018

Research suggests that eating crickets may improve inflammation in the gut and its overall health, according to a study led by Valerie Stull, a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The investigators looked at whether cricket consumption was tolerable and safe and changed markers of inflammation or lipid metabolism, and they assessed whether insect fibers such as chitin -- the chief component of a cricket's exoskeleton -- could work as prebiotics.

8/20/2018

Type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity are behind a spike in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, with most of the cases among baby boomers, gastroenterologist Zobair Younossi said at the annual meeting of the American College of Physicians. Younossi and other researchers conducted a meta-analysis of studies in 20 countries, which was published in Hepatology Communications and found that the global prevalence of NAFLD is 24%, but nearly 75% of patients with the disease are obese, and 58% of people with diabetes also have NAFLD.

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Family Practice News