News for Providers
Top stories summarized by our editors
4/20/2018

The gut microbiomes in two dog breeds are more similar than mouse or pig microbiomes to the bacterial populations in humans' guts, and changes in dietary carbohydrate and protein levels affected dog and human gut flora similarly. The findings, published in Microbiome, suggest not only that dogs could be good models for human nutrition studies, but also that human nutrition studies might be applicable to dogs.

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Microbiome
4/20/2018

An international team of veterinarians and food safety scientists reported in Emerging Infectious Diseases that three dromedary camels in Algeria tested positive for a prion similar to the one that causes bovine spongiform encephalopathy, and they say immediate action should be taken to safeguard animal and human health. The prion could have come from infected feed, and researchers do not know whether it can be passed from animals to people who consume infected meat.

4/20/2018

The USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service should document the process for developing new pathogen standards, set deadlines for updating old standards and developing new standards, and review the effectiveness of on-farm efforts to reduce pathogens in meat and poultry products, a Government Accountability Office report says.

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Food Safety News
4/20/2018

Emergency medicine physicians say barriers to providing palliative care in the emergency department include a lack of time on their part and poor coordination with the hospital's palliative care service, said Dr. David Wang, an emergency medicine doctor and director of palliative medicine services at Scripps Health. Wang said there continues to be a tendency to conflate palliative, hospice and comfort care, and physicians still fear legal liability if they do anything less than everything possible to save patients.

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GeriPal blog
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poor coordination, Scripps Health, ER
4/20/2018

Jerome Hamon, a 43-year-old man with neurofibromatosis type 1, received a face transplant in 2010, but that face was removed in November after his immune system began rejecting the tissue. Hamon stayed in a Paris hospital until a suitable donor face was available, and the same transplant surgeon, Laurent Lantieri, led the latest procedure.

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BBC
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Laurent Lantieri
4/20/2018

Celebrities have made facial filling so popular that the term "filler fatigue" has come into common parlance to describe the counterproductive effects of filler overuse. Facial plastic surgeons say fillers stretch the skin, which then sags when fillers are dissolved or absorbed unless the pocket is refilled or tightened by either surgery or treatment with a skin-tightening device.

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HuffPost
4/20/2018

A study in The BMJ showed an association between the use of an artificial pancreas and a significantly higher proportion of time in the near normoglycemic range both overnight and over a 24-hour period among type 1 diabetes patients. Greek researchers analyzed 40 randomized controlled trials involving 1,027 participants and data for 44 comparisons and found that treatment with an artificial pancreas had a favorable effect on the proportion of time with sensor blood glucose levels above 10 mmol/L or below 3.9 mmol/L over 24 hours, compared with the control group.

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diabetes
4/20/2018

Pregnant women with gestational diabetes who received a tailored letter with personalized recommendations for gestational weight management were more likely to meet the Institute of Medicine guidelines for gestational weight gain, compared with those who received usual care, according to a study in Diabetes Care. Researchers used a cohort of 2,014 women and found that those in the intervention group were also less likely to have babies born large for gestational age, compared with the usual care group.

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diabetes, Institute of Medicine
4/20/2018

The Joint Commission has issued recommendations to healthcare organizations that involve seven steps needed to address physical and verbal workplace violence. "In order to truly eliminate workplace violence, it is critical that nurses, other healthcare professionals, and their employers shift the professional and workplace culture to adopt a mindset of zero tolerance that diminishes barriers to reporting," said Cheryl Peterson, ANA's vice president of nursing programs.

4/20/2018

A time and motion study evaluated the various workflow interruptions that disrupt emergency department nurses during EMR documentation and caring for their patients. The findings, published in the International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, showed that the five most common interruptions were of phone calls, colleagues, residents, doctors and patients' relatives.