News for Providers
Top stories summarized by our editors
1/18/2018

This activity will cover data presented at the American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Session 2017. The expert faculty discuss the role of PCSK9 inhibitors for the treatment of dyslipidemia, including achieving LDL-C goals, cardiovascular risk reduction and managing special patient populations. The faculty will discuss different approaches of how to implement newer therapies into individualized treatment plans. Upon completing this activity, you may receive up to 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Begin this activity!

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American Heart Association
1/18/2018

Good nutrition is about balance in calorie intake and the types of food eaten, says registered dietitian Jeanne Kincaid. Calories matter even when eating healthy foods, Kincaid says, and balance means eating "a little bit of everything, not an overabundance or one over the other."

1/18/2018

Nondairy milks are popular due to increased interest in plant-based diets, and oat milk is less expensive to make and may be better for the environment than nut milk, registered dietitian Kelly Jones says. Although oat milk is higher in carbohydrates than other options, Jones says it can be a good choice for people with dairy intolerance or a nut allergy, and those who want to limit consumption of saturated fat.

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Shape.com
1/18/2018

Patients with type 2 diabetes living in communities with the most exercise opportunities and in areas with the best food availability had an up to 0.19% and a 0.10% greater improvement in their A1C levels, respectively, compared with those in places with the fewest physical activity resources and in communities that do not offer healthy food options, according to a study in Diabetes Care. Researchers evaluated 15,308 patients with poorly controlled diabetes at baseline with an average age of 58 and found that socioeconomic deprivation and chronic stress also negatively affect blood glucose control among diabetes patients.

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Reuters
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diabetes, blood glucose
1/18/2018

Want to present at FNCE® 2018 in Washington, D.C.? Now's your chance to submit a poster session abstract! Submissions will close Feb. 15 at 11:59 p.m. (Central). Submit an abstract.

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sm.eatright.org
1/18/2018

Researchers examined F-18 florbetapir PET data from 977 participants in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative and found that the adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette subfamily A member 7 gene, which had the strongest association with amyloid deposition after the apolipoprotein E epsilon-4 gene, was significantly linked to asymptomatic and early symptomatic Alzheimer's, while the fermitin family homolog 2 had a stage-dependent correlation with brain amyloidosis, especially among those with mild cognitive impairment. The findings, published in JAMA Neurology, "suggest that AD genes might differentially regulate AD pathologic findings across the disease stages," researchers wrote.

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Alzheimer
1/18/2018

An abundance of oral Corynebacterium and Kingella bacteria was associated with a reduced risk of head and neck squamous cell cancer in a study published in JAMA Oncology. Previous studies have shown the bacteria can metabolize specific toxicants in cigarette smoke, and the findings support the theory that a healthy oral microbiome has a role in preventing HNSCC, researchers wrote.

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JAMA Oncology
1/18/2018

Cyclopharma has appointed Peter Webner as its US CEO effective Jan. 1. Webner will lead US development of companion diagnostic PET tracers for oncology, including overseeing the FDA submission and approval of EstroTep, a PET tracer for metastatic breast cancer, by the end of next year.

1/18/2018

Maryland hospitals that shifted from fee-for-service to a global budget model did not see significant reductions in readmissions or increases in outpatient and primary care, according to a study in JAMA Internal Medicine. The 46 hospitals met budget goals but did so by adjusting prices.

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The Baltimore Sun
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JAMA Internal Medicine
1/18/2018

A study in the Joint Commission Journal of Quality and Patient Safety found surveys of care teams after unexpected patient deaths provided valuable information on advance directives, goals of care, care coordination and clinician distress. The surveys also showed clinicians overestimated the preventability of death by almost tenfold.

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HealthLeaders Media