News for Providers
Top editor picks, summarized for you
9/23/2016

Minnesota health officials have opened an expanded poultry testing facility in order to more efficiently and rapidly check samples for avian influenza and other diseases that affect poultry. State veterinarian Beth Thompson said having the lab's faster results on avian influenza will improve disease response times and should enable scientists to more rapidly contain any outbreak.

9/23/2016

People whose diet quality decreased by more than 10% over four years were at a 34% increased likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a study in Diabetes Care. The findings, based on the Health Professionals Follow-up Study and the Nurses' Health Study I and II involving 124,607 adults without diabetes, revealed 32% of the new cases of diabetes were attributed to changes in body mass index.

Full Story:
Diabetes.co.uk (U.K.)
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diabetes, body mass index
9/23/2016

The US ranked 47th in a 50-country comparison of physical fitness levels among children ages 9 to 17, according to a study in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. Data showed that countries with higher income inequality were more likely to have less physically fit youths, with Tanzania, Iceland, Estonia, Norway and Japan having the most fit children and Mexico having the least fit.

9/23/2016

Only 10% of young gay and bisexual men use pre-exposure prophylaxis, with black and Latino youths reporting less awareness of PrEP than their white counterparts, according to a study by APLA Health and the California HIV/AIDS Research Program.

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HIV
9/23/2016

A report estimated the number of US Latinos with Alzheimer's disease would increase from 379,000 in 2012 to 3.5 million by 2060. The report by the University of Southern California and the LatinosAgainstAlzheimer's network makes numerous recommendations, including increasing research funding, raising awareness of dementias in minority neighborhoods, and offering caregiver training and resources in multiple languages.

9/23/2016

Breakthrough PET probes specific to epidermal growth factor receptor 1 and human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 developed by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center identified cell surface receptor changes in breast cancer and provided real-time data allowing them to block cancer cells with increased cell surface receptor. The findings in the Journal of Nuclear Medicine suggest the approach could be used to image many specific cell processes and may help optimize treatment and prevent unnecessary biopsies, said researcher Dr. Umar Mahmood.

Full Story:
DOTMed.com
9/23/2016

Experts say diet and exercise play a role in fighting belly fat, but reducing stress and obtaining adequate sleep also are important. Registered dietitian Rebecca Mohning says good hydration and getting plenty of fiber and complex carbohydrates are part of a fat-burning diet, but getting enough sleep is most important, followed by stress reduction, nutrition and exercise.

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Rebecca Mohning
9/23/2016

An analysis of data from eight studies found weight loss strategies can be just as successful for people who have the FTO gene -- known as the obesity gene -- as they are for those without it, researchers reported in The BMJ. Researchers said efforts to reduce obesity should focus on healthier eating habits and exercise, which can help people lose weight long-term regardless of whether they have genes linked to obesity.

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HealthDay News
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Obesity, FTO, BMJ
9/23/2016

Home delivery meal services that provide fresh ingredients and preparation instructions can be healthy and convenient, and even teach people how to cook, but dietitians say they also can be expensive and high in calories. Registered dietitian Sheryl Lozicki says dinners can cost $10 or more per person and dietitian Paul Halloran says 750 calories may be too much for just one meal.

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Sheryl Lozicki, 750 calories
9/23/2016

Washington's Clallam County Jail treats inmates with anti-craving drug Suboxone in the state's only jail-based medically assisted drug treatment program.
"They are still returning to the social environment they came from before ... but at least they are not craving narcotics, feeling miserable and wanting to use," jail physician Art Tordini said.