News for Providers
Top stories summarized by our editors
11/17/2017

A study in JAMA Ophthalmology found that older women who underwent cataract surgery had a lower risk of premature death, compared with those who did not have surgery. The findings, based on data for 74,044 Women's Health Initiative participants aged 71 years on average who had cataracts, showed a 37% to 69% reduced risk of mortality due to accidents, cancer and infectious, pulmonary, neurologic and vascular diseases among those who had cataract surgery.

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Reuters
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vascular diseases
11/17/2017

Dogs with intervertebral disc disease were 50 times as likely as dogs without IVDD to have the FGF4 retrogene on CFA12, researchers reported in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. "Being able to identify the cause of this painful condition is the first step to alleviating pain and suffering for dogs at greatest risk," said veterinary geneticist Danika Bannasch, the paper's senior author.

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JAVMA News
11/17/2017

UK researchers evaluated data from more than 300,000 type 2 diabetes patients and found that those who had lower A1C levels were at an increased risk of dying, compared with those who had moderate A1C levels. The findings in the journal Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism also showed that different types of diabetes medications influenced the mortality pattern related to glucose control.

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diabetes
11/17/2017

A study in the Journal of Diabetes Investigation showed that Chinese women who completed natural menopause at age 53 or older had a 1.25 times higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those who completed menopause from ages 46 to 52. Chinese researchers used a cohort of 17,076 postmenopausal women and found that the association between diabetes and later age at natural menopause did not differ by body mass index, physical activity, smoking or use of contraception.

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menopause, body mass index
11/17/2017

The present health threat of antibiotic-resistant bacteria will be the focus of Antibiotic Awareness Week, to be observed Nov. 13 to 20. Nurse Rita Olans, an assistant professor of the MGH Institute of Health Professions School of Nursing, is among those aligning her work with that of the ANA, which has put together an antimicrobial stewardship working group that is raising awareness about antibiotic resistance.

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ANA
11/17/2017

The attorney for the nurse arrested for refusing to allow police to draw a blood sample from an unconscious patient says that the current proposed legislation in Utah doesn't protect medical staff. Attorney Karra Porter is requesting that state officials add immunity for nurses and other medical personnel who don't participate in a police order to draw blood, even if there is a warrant.

11/17/2017

A case study in the journal Neurosurgery described how F-18-FDDNP-PET identified a distinctive pattern of tau accumulation in chronic traumatic encephalopathy, as well as damage in brain regions related to CTE symptoms such as memory loss and emotional changes three years before the death of former NFL player Fred McNeill, and an autopsy confirmed the CTE diagnosis, making it the first case of CTE identified in a living person. Funds are being raised to evaluate FDDNP-PET for CTE in a late-stage trial, and a commercial CTE test may be available in less than five years, said lead author Dr. Bennet Omalu.

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CNN, NBC News
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CTE, NFL
11/17/2017

Nutrition information can be confusing due to how it is presented by the media, the type of studies and evidence used, and bias on the part of researchers and consumers, said registered dietitian Jennifer Brown. Information that tries to sell something should be viewed with caution, Brown said, and consumers should seek information sources that strive to be science-based and unbiased.

11/17/2017

Indiana University registered dietitian Catherine Shepherd said many students seek her help for nutrition issues tied to their class schedules and availability, and she often tells them they need to create a plan for eating healthy and eat more frequently. Shepherd said students ask for help with diets for sports training, eating disorders, vegetarianism, health issues such as diabetes, or simply to use the free appointment that comes with their student health fee.

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Indiana University, diabetes
11/17/2017

Thanksgiving Day dinner can top 3,000 calories, but registered dietitian Jill Koegel said it's fine to splurge for the day and get back to a regular healthy eating routine the next day. A pre-meal workout can help counter the extra calories and a post-meal walk can help the digestive process, she says.

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Thanksgiving Day