Engineering
Top stories summarized by our editors
4/24/2018

A Swiss study demonstrates that numerical modeling using nonuniform sediment is generally valid to gauge the effectiveness of streambank erosion as a means of gravel entrainment for replenishing sediment on riverbeds with artificial gravel deposits.

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MDPI (Switzerland)
4/24/2018

Adding the rest of the spectrum of light to the visible portion that solar cells currently use could greatly boost their efficiency. Nanoparticles may provide the answer, say researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, who have used the tiny particles coated in dyes to make near-infrared light visible.

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New Atlas
4/24/2018

In a gene therapy breakthrough, CRISPR-Cas9 technology has been used to repair a genetic flaw that causes diseases in human embryos, barring the flaw from being passed on. The development, however, opens a new field of concerns that will require a different kind of regulatory review.

4/23/2018

Science, technology, engineering, the arts and math can help to inform history instruction, K-12 leadership experts Jill Berkowicz and Ann Myers write. In this blog post, they urge history teachers to consider STEAM because it holds "the key to helping history become personal lessons that can be felt and understood."

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Ann Myers, Jill Berkowicz
4/23/2018

The mechanics of air conditioners, which have been around for more than a century, haven't changed much. But Ernest Chua, professor of mechanical engineering at the National University of Singapore, has developed a green alternative that employs super-hydrophilic paper filters and no chlorofluorocarbons to both dehumidify and cool the air using only a small fraction of the energy.

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ASME
4/23/2018

Conjugated polymers are the key to an organic artificial eye developed by a team led by Fabio Benfenati, director of the Italian Institute of Technology's Center for Synaptic Neuroscience and Technology. When implanted under the retina, they act in place of missing photoreceptors to help capture light and convert it to electrical pulses interpreted by the brain to successfully restore vision in a blind rat.

4/23/2018

University of California at Berkeley researchers created a thin film that captures and recycles waste heat and energy. The film can be built into cars, computers or factories that generate low-quality waste heat that is less than 212 degrees.

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New Atlas
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University of California
4/20/2018

Technical skills are, of course, a top priority for aspiring engineers. But soft skills are also vital for career advancement, and Agam Shah reviews 12 you should cultivate, beginning with communication.

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ASME
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Agam Shah
4/20/2018

Using hyperspectral imaging of data from the electromagnetic spectrum, China's TanSat satellite has produced a global map of different elements and materials in the atmosphere. They include the carbon dioxide contributing to changing weather patterns as the map pins down the hot spots where human activity causes the most emissions.

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New Atlas
4/20/2018

A University of British Columbia bioengineer mixed platelets with thrombin-infused liposomes to speed clotting by 30% in healthy volunteers, according to a study in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis. Coagulation speeds increased by 20% to 40% when the platelets were administered to two patients with trauma-induced coagulopathy.