Engineering
Top stories summarized by our editors
8/14/2018

Learn how to identify a variety of slope failure types and provide instruction for the use of visual and investigative procedures for their identification, presented by IECA Board Member Jerry Sanders, CPESC. Register now!

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ieca.org
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Jerry Sanders, IECA
8/14/2018

SMRP Exchange is an exclusive, new online community for SMRP members to connect, learn and share their expertise with others across the maintenance, reliability and physical asset management profession. Members can participate in thought leadership and forum discussion groups, share best practices, ask questions and communicate with fellow members in real-time. It is also available on Apple and Android mobile devices. To get started, click here.

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smrp.org
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SMRP, Apple
8/14/2018

Join us this Thursday, Aug. 16, at 12:00 p.m. EDT for a webinar on "The Future of Predictive Technology," led by CTI Predictive Technology CTO David Bukowitz. This presentation looks at the future technology path of predictive maintenance, including artificial intelligence (AI), cloud technology and more. Register today!

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portal.smrp.org
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AI
8/14/2018

A new device could help protect transplanted islet cells from being attacked by the body's immune system without stopping oxygen and other important nutrients from reaching the cells. The device could help diabetics struggling with insulin regulation.

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MIT
8/14/2018

To help combat the amount of plastic cluttering stretches of the Pacific Ocean between California and Hawaii, a group called The Ocean Cleanup has designed a cost-effective float-and-skirt system that harnesses wind power to move with the ocean's current to collect trash. "To catch the plastic, we need to act like plastic," CEO Boyan Slat says.

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ASME
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Boyan Slat, cluttering
8/14/2018

Scientists have theorized that, in addition to flat graphene and round buckyballs, carbon nanostructures should be able to take a third form with its own electrical, magnetic and optical properties. Recently, an international research team developed a way to create that form -- a structure with a negative curvature known as schwarzite.

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New Atlas
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University of California
8/14/2018

ASME's inaugural Engineering Festival (E-Fest) in South America, which was held July 27-29 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, marked another high point for the E-Fest program. The event drew more than 500 participants from across South America and Mexico. ASME E-Fest South America, held at Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), encompassed a variety of engaging activities, including a daily internship fair, a student leadership training session, tours of the UFRJ campus, networking opportunities, a keynote session featuring speakers from Stratasys and Hyperloop, presentations from industry leaders such as National Instruments, ANSYS and Altair, as well as several student competitions.

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asme.org
8/13/2018

Hyuck Choo, a Caltech professor of electrical and medical engineering, has developed a medical implant sensor that allows glaucoma patients to monitor their own eye pressure. The sensor, inspired by the wings of a longtail glasswing butterfly, works like a tiny drum to detect eye pressure changes that can be gauged with a portable device.

8/13/2018

Researchers at Georgia Tech have developed a robot that forgoes vision and instead uses haptics to help physically impaired users get dresses. Most robots only consider how their own actions can accomplish tasks, but this new robot can consider the human perspective and adjust its actions based the physical reactions of the person, says Zackory Erickson, the lead Ph.D. student on the project.

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ASME
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Georgia Tech
8/13/2018

The Bjarke Ingels Group's Shenzhen Energy Mansion is a twisting, two-tower project in China with an aluminum skin that is pleated and folded in a particular pattern to help lessen glare from the sun. "[It] reduces the overall energy consumption of the building without any moving parts or complicated technology," the design firm says.

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New Atlas
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Bjarke Ingels Group