Engineering
Top editor picks, summarized for you
2/12/2016

Adding a third dimension to lymphoma modeling may be the key to a revolution in treatment in a few years. If so, engineering expertise will receive some of the credit. Ankur Singh, an assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Cornell University, is at work creating a 3D modular system to provide new insights into the disease.

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ASME.org
2/12/2016

Canada's Spring Loaded Technology is preparing to release a consumer version of its passive knee brace under the brand name Levitation that uses liquid-spring technology to absorb shock. Levitation will be marketed to athletes as a performance device and as a therapeutic device for people with joint pain. The company has a contract with the Canadian Armed Forces to supply its UpShot model for military use.

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ZDNet, Metro (Canada)
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Spring Loaded Technology, Canada
2/12/2016

Biomedical engineers at the Harvard University's John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and a few miles away at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are taking two different approaches toward the same goal: treating or curing diabetes. The researchers at Harvard are developing algorithms to help glucose pumps and sensors work together, making an artificial pancreas possible. The MIT scientists are developing a gel that protects islet cells from immune-system attacks while allowing the cells to function normally.

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Reuters
2/12/2016

Bilateral below-knee amputee Erik Bowen, who lost his legs to infection in 2014, was fitted for specialized prostheses that attach directly to his ski bindings. The devices, developed by orthotist-prosthetist Chad O'Connor at the Hanger Clinic in Lafayette, Colo., includes an adjustable socket valve that sucks out air to provide a tighter fit.

2/12/2016

Four hundred wooden components moving in coordination make up an elaborate mechanical clock that writes out the time once a minute with four magnetic pens. The complex timepiece is the product of students at Japan's Tohoku University of Art And Design.

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Gizmodo
2/11/2016

One of the latest products emerging from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is a 130-foot autonomous submarine hunter. The Anti-Submarine Warfare Continuous Trail Unmanned Vessel, due for launch this year, is designed to troll the oceans and carry out its mission without human intervention. The project is part of a bigger drive by DARPA to develop systems more quickly that can adapt to changing threats from increasingly capable enemies.

2/11/2016

An advanced autopilot for small aircraft is touted by its maker as an ideal safety device, taking over controls in an emergency and flying the plane to an airport where it lands autonomously. The system, developed by Germany's Diamond Aircraft, senses when a pilot is incapacitated and then assumes control.

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Wired.com
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Diamond Aircraft, Germany
2/11/2016

Palmaz Vineyards, a winery in California’s Napa Valley, has gone high-tech, using a submarine technology called sono-densitometry to aid in the fermentation process. The winery's Fermentation Intelligence Logic Control System analyzes wine at a molecular level, allowing the makers to adjust the temperature for ideal fermentation conditions.

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Napa Valley, Palmaz Vineyards
2/10/2016

The coil spring is familiar enough, but the wave spring is an alternative with many industrial applications. The force for these springs is generated from bending rather than torsion, and their small size makes them ideal for purposes such as preloading bearings.

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ASME.org
2/10/2016

The US Army has announced plans to test convoys equipped with vehicle-to-infrastructure technology on a highway in Michigan starting this summer, while the Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center works on developing autonomous supply trucks that could eliminate the need for human drivers on logistics or dangerous tasks. Military testing of the new technologies could help accelerate and improve civilian vehicle development, Jason Britt writes.