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2/22/2018

Columbia University scientists are developing a chip-based blood test to detect eight tick-borne diseases, according to a study in the journal Scientific Reports. The test detects antibodies for Babesia microti, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi, Borrelia miyamotoi, Ehrlichia chaffeensis, Rickettsia rickettsii, the Powassan virus and the Heartland virus.

2/22/2018

Dr. Cameron Tebbi is a retired pediatric hematologist-oncologist in Tampa, Fla., who has dedicated his retirement to developing a leukemia vaccine that could help prevent the disease. With 40 years of research to back his work, Tebbi has created a protein that can distinguish between normal and leukemic cells, which will help clinicians identify children with a higher risk of developing cancer.

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hematologist
2/22/2018

California has issued $3 billion worth of bonds to fund the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, and the authority to fund the stem cell agency ends next year. The state recently received its first royalty payment, but so far the return is well short of what supporters have promised, says FasterCures Senior Fellow Bernard Munos.

2/22/2018

Proposed policies from the White House and Congress threaten to further dilute the NIH's purchasing power and encourages risk aversion instead of boldness and innovation, and efforts to change the dynamic are "hampered by a political environment increasingly suspicious of the entire scientific enterprise," writes Dana-Farber Cancer Institute President and CEO Laurie Glimcher. Private-sector attention and investment along with political support can get biomedical research back on track and yield enormous economic and public health dividends, Glimcher writes.

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CNBC
2/22/2018

CRISPR gene-editing technology shows promise in developing a cure for sickle cell disease, but longstanding distrust of the medical establishment among many African-Americans could impede clinical trial recruitment. Researchers have been meeting with leaders of black churches and surveying patient communities, but they say more outreach will be needed.

2/21/2018

Mylan's fixed-dose combination of dolutegravir, emtricitabine and tenofovir alafenamide pill received tentative approval from the FDA as a treatment for patients with HIV infection in developing countries.

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Mylan
2/21/2018

Ctenocephalides felis, or the domestic cat flea, may be developing resistance to commonly used insecticides, but until now, progress on a vaccine has been limited. Researchers recently used transcriptomics and proteomics data from C. felis to identify protective recombinant antigens, developed a subcutaneous vaccine and reported in Parasites & Vectors that the antigens could be used alone or in combination in vaccines to control cat fleas.

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American Veterinarian
2/21/2018

Stick-on throat sensors have been developed by scientist John Rogers at Northwestern University in partnership with the Shirley Ryan AbilityLab to monitor the progress of patients who have had a stroke, particularly those with aphasia. The sensors, which are used with on-body sensors developed by Rogers' team for monitoring muscle movement and heart rhythm, evaluate patients' swallowing ability and detect unusual speech characteristics.

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MedGadget
2/21/2018

Acorda Therapeutics' new-drug application for inhaled Inbrija, or levodopa, which is being developed to treat off periods in patients with Parkinson's disease who are currently on a carbidopa/levodopa regimen, was accepted by the FDA for review. The agency has set Oct. 5 as the PDUFA date.

2/21/2018

Findings from a study reported in the Journal of Hepatology found that the drug Vesatolimod, or GS-9620, was well tolerated and safe to use in virally suppressed patients with chronic hepatitis B. The midstage study involved 162 patients from 23 international centers who received varying doses of Vesatolimod or placebo for 12 weeks.