HR & Career
Top stories summarized by our editors
4/9/2020

Companies cannot retaliate against employees who report unsafe working conditions amid the current public health crisis, says the Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration. The warning comes after workers in different regions -- including an emergency room doctor in Washington state -- were fired for voicing concerns about the safety of their workplaces.

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The Hill
4/9/2020

The coronavirus pandemic has affected the hiring process in a number of ways, including changes in networking, communicating, interviewing and onboarding. "Be prepared and anticipate delays so you can reposition yourself, remain optimistic, and keep your pipeline full," writes recruiter and consultant Lisa Rangel.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
4/9/2020

In order to avoid unconscious bias, employers and interviewees should opt for an interview via phone call before video conference. With everyone staying home, not all interviewees are equipped to ready their appearance to overcome bias.

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Fast Company online
4/9/2020

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have released new guidelines on essential workers who have been exposed to a confirmed or suspected case of coronavirus. The recommendations include taking daily temperatures, increasing air exchange in buildings where these employees work and increasing cleaning efforts.

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National Public Radio
4/9/2020

Chief HR officers have become business strategists, partners on the executive team and catalysts for driving change, says Holly Kortright, senior vice president of people at Ellucian. "The CHRO is also becoming a more critical advisor to the board," she says.

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Heidrick & Struggles
4/9/2020

A health care organization created a better learning culture by listening to employees' needs, building on strengths and developing a structured process for participation, writes Rod Githens. The successful approach helped the organization empower employees to learn rather than relying on trainers to lead the process.

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Rod Githens
4/9/2020

Employees drive and improve company culture when they're allowed to express their concerns, work on projects they're passionate about and bond through celebrations, team building and wellness events, writes Natalie Baumgartner, chief workforce scientist at Achievers. "Building a culture of recognition -- where acknowledgement and appreciation is given frequently and in real-time -- also enhances an organization's resilience," she writes.

4/9/2020

Chief HR officers should work with chief financial officers on financial literacy programs because employee loyalty can be improved when companies show they care about financial well-being, writes Archana Remane Dhore, chief financial officer for RiVidium. The financial effects go both ways, as replacing a departed employee is expensive for the organization.

4/9/2020

Royal Dutch Shell is working with Udacity to teach artificial-intelligence skills through a customized online program. "We're not teaching them how to apply an algorithm, but we are teaching them the various techniques, how to get operational leverage, and what bias in the models to look for," says Gabe Dalporto, CEO of Udacity.

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CNBC
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Royal Dutch Shell, Shell, Udacity
4/9/2020

Some laid-off workers will receive more in unemployment benefits than they did in salary, owing to the federal government's $600-per-week supplement to state payouts. Some lawmakers are concerned that the temporary benefit boost may prompt some employers to implement -- or some workers to ask for -- layoffs.

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University of Washington