Industry News
HR & Career
Top stories summarized by our editors
7/9/2020

The gig economy is here to stay, and there are ways to work productively with freelancers -- on top of paying them on time. "The best way to make those who gig feel valued is to connect them with their end customers so that they can get direct feedback on the service and support they've provided, and also see how they have made a difference to someone," writes Roger Beadle, co-founder of Limitless.

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Business 2 Community
7/9/2020

Fire ants, whose stings are painful and can prompt a hospital visit, are moving from the southern US to farther up north as nighttime temperatures increase. The venomous ants were accidentally brought from South America to Alabama in the 1930s.

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New York Post
7/9/2020

Flexible schedules and work arrangements, as well as new projects and roles, are two ways to help employees without increasing salary, writes Anastasiia Osypova, head of people, engagement and culture at Innovecs. "Another non-monetary motivator is to make employees happier by alleviating their home routine duties, giving access to engaging webinars, online courses, podcasts on healthy eating, meditation applications, back exercises, and much more," Osypova writes.

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The Next Web
7/9/2020

Professional mentoring can extend to your personal working life, especially if you have children to juggle. Seek out co-workers with children of similar ages as well as older children to help you navigate balancing your home life with the company's culture.

7/9/2020

To convince your boss that you would like to work remotely permanently, prepare a one-page memo that outlines your reasons -- but focus on how the company would benefit from this arrangement and not how you would personally benefit. There are three "don'ts" to keep in mind when drafting your appeal, writes Arianne Cohen, and consider asking for a trial run.

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Arianne Cohen
7/9/2020

A Zety survey suggests American workers are reluctant to tell HR about workplace mistreatment because they worry the problem wouldn't be addressed or that they've be penalized for speaking up, writes William Arruda, founder of CareerBlast. He advises HR to assess and revise not only policies, but also the wording of such guidance.

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Forbes
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William Arruda
7/9/2020

Corporate financial health is a concern for the majority of HR leaders polled by Human Resources Director, with freezes in raises and hiring the most common response. Meanwhile, HR leaders in Wales discuss how the coronavirus pandemic has changed discussions about company culture and shifted thinking from "'why do you need to work from home?' to 'why do you need to travel to the office?' " says Simon Boulcott, The Crown Estate's head of people.

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The Crown Estate
7/9/2020

A Supreme Court ruling in favor of the Trump administration has cleared the way for a federal rule expanding exemptions to the Affordable Care Act's birth control coverage requirements, permitting more employers to stop covering contraceptives on moral and religious grounds.

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The Hill
7/9/2020

Use the "9-box" matrix tool to create a discussion around existing performance and the people identified as high-potential employees, writes leadership consultant Karen Walker. Managers give their views on where employees should be placed in the three-by-three matrix, which ultimately highlights the most promising talent and gaps in the company's succession plan.

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Forbes
7/9/2020

Workplace pledges of respect and professional behavior are one option for HR to lead organizations through social unrest and minimize at-work conflicts, says Brian Koegle, employment attorney at Poole Shaffery & Koegle. "Putting employee commitments in writing reminds your entire team that the business is serious about providing a safe working environment and that there could be serious consequences for violating the terms of the written agreement," Koegle says.