HR & Career
Top stories summarized by our editors
2/20/2020

Papa John's has hired executives for people, diversity and inclusion and equity in the past two years, as well as added or improved employee offerings such as tuition-free education, employee assistance programs, fitness opportunities and employee resource groups. "I wasn't part of what happened before, but I can tell you the mandate I was given was to build a great organization and, to do that, you have to start on the inside, start with a purpose," says Marvin Boakye, chief people officer.

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Forbes
2/20/2020

During your job search, make a list of companies that you would like to work for and then follow the company as well as key executives on social media and check their job site frequently, suggests Caroline Ceniza-Levine. "Once you have your target list of companies, find the competitors for each company on your list to make sure you're covering as many relevant companies as possible," she writes.

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Forbes
2/20/2020

If you fear your job might be eliminated because of a merger or restructuring, make sure you are maintaining your network. "When you build your network before you're in crisis, you can show people how passionate you are about what you do and reveal your capabilities from a place of job stability," writes Susan Peppercorn.

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Susan Peppercorn
2/20/2020

People are known to lie on their resume, with 60% claiming they have full knowledge of a skill while they actually have limited knowledge, according to a recent Checkster survey. Other lies, which most hiring managers overlook, include inflating a job title, fudging time spent at a company and not giving the real reason they left a job.

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HR Dive
2/20/2020

To form a new habit, try stacking it with existing ones, such as adding yoga poses while your coffee brews, writes Tara Parker-Pope. Another way to get a habit to stick is to start small, such as taking a daily walk, and then build momentum from there, says Stanford University researcher B.J. Fogg.

2/20/2020

HR departments will need to be able to manage data, technology, the psychology of employee performance and the latest skill requirements, writes Sharon Lobo. "Smart companies need to have employee experience teams with specialists that work only with the notion to make an employee's experience better at the workplace," she writes.

2/20/2020

Chief HR officers are becoming more confident in using analytics to predict which employees have leadership potential, writes Craig Wallace, management department head at Clemson University's College of Business. "True predictive analytics, like decision-tree modeling, can provide precise fit more than 90 percent of the time, while older methods might describe 15 percent of performance (that leaves a lot of room for guesswork)," he writes.

2/20/2020

HR leaders are becoming more involved with business teams, which requires "consulting, influencing and partnering skills," says K.S. Harish, country group HR head for Bayer in South Asia. Conversely, he predicts, technology will reduce HR's involvement in recruiting and performance management.

2/20/2020

HR leaders should help employees feel like they can confide in them, says Peter Fasolo, chief HR officer for Johnson & Johnson. "Because if you violate a confidence, then your credibility is gone, and if your credibility is gone as a CHRO, you can't do your job," he says.

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LinkedIn
2/20/2020

Take responsibility for employees' success by establishing goals, mapping out a plan and seeking help along the way, writes Randolph Matusky, a learning and development supervisor at Freddie Mac. "A leader that provides constructive feedback empowers the whole team, allowing everyone to be accountable," he writes.