HR & Career
Top stories summarized by our editors
4/23/2019

Two Google employees, Meredith Whittaker and Claire Stapleton, say they are victims of retaliation by the company for organizing a staff walkout last November. The women say their job roles were changed dramatically after the protest, but Google denies the events are connected, saying that job adjustments are routine order of business.

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Google
4/23/2019

Some argue feedback is constructive only when it focuses on our strengths, writes Meghan Moravcik Walbert. Research has found negative feedback significantly slows our ability to learn, while positive comments encourage us to build on our success.

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Lifehacker
4/23/2019

While his grandmother was asleep, five-year-old Iziah Hall in Wyoming, Mich. called 911 and asked the dispatcher to bring him McDonald's. The dispatcher contacted police officer Dan Patterson, who went to check on the boy and he even brought Iziah some food because "I figured hey I'm driving past McDonald's on my way there and I might as well get him something," said Patterson.

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McDonald, Dan Patterson
4/23/2019

Data from a survey by Total Brain shows that one-third of US adults age 18 to 54 say anxiety or depression cuts into their work productivity, a hardship for them and a cost to their employers, writes Louis Gagnon. Employers can help support workers dealing with issues by offering digital apps and access to screenings, and pointing the way to treatment.

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TLNT
4/23/2019

LinkedIn profiles reflect poorly on users when they fail to feature quality photos, career summaries, searchable keywords or invitations to connect, writes brand strategist Rachel Weingarten. Users are more approachable when they tone down self-promotion and post only positive comments about others.

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Ladders
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LinkedIn, Rachel Weingarten
4/23/2019

People who are in a rut at work might be reinvigorated by learning new skills in another department, writes Julianne Pepitone. Lateral moves often require patience as pay may decrease initially but new opportunities for advancement arise.

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Glassdoor
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Julianne Pepitone
4/23/2019

People experience improved brain function and less stress when they clear their schedule a couple times a day for two to five minutes of silence, writes nurse practitioner Ingrid Forsberg. They also need to clear their mind of noise, focusing only on breathing and a calming phrase.

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Thrive Global
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Ingrid Forsberg
4/23/2019

HR adopts new technologies quickly, but decisions, innovation and social interaction should be left with people, says Magdalena Poulin, AIG's Asia Pacific head of diversity and inclusion. "Automation helps collect data and analysis of the workforce, benefits and performance, but we still need experienced staff to decide what to do with this data: how to propose improvements, update or change policies and handle special individual cases," she says.

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AIG, Asia Pacific
4/23/2019

Improve your company culture by building a diverse workforce, connecting with employees and recognizing their accomplishments, says Mike Koehler, chief HR officer at the University of Missouri Health Care. "Speak truth to power above you," he says.

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Thrive Global
4/23/2019

A survey by Oracle of HR and finance executives found that of the 1,510 respondents across 23 countries, 94% of respondents said they were able to predict whether employees were going to quit and 89% agreed they were "highly skilled" at using data to find out workforce needs. Most respondents answered that AI was their most-used analytical tool.

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Oracle, AI