HR & Career
Top stories summarized by our editors
6/26/2019

Make the most of your interview situation and schedule your interview in the morning when possible, says Kimberly Thompson. "It can be easier for an interviewer to concentrate with a clear mind on you before their day gets hectic," Thompson writes.

More Summaries:
Kimberly Thompson
6/26/2019

A new tool moves employee assessment beyond questionnaires and interviews to employing smartphones and fitness trackers to track everything from heart function to employee location. The app's developer, professor Andrew Campbell at New Hampshire's Dartmouth College, calls the passive monitoring system "empowering."

Full Story:
New Atlas
6/26/2019

Symantec restructured its work culture by collecting data, supplementing that data with human interaction like listening tours, and taking a strategic approach, says Chief HR Officer Amy Cappellanti-Wolf. She noted it is important to define a vision of success and to create a list of top priorities, as well as goals and actions.

Full Story:
SmartBrief/Leadership
More Summaries:
Symantec
6/26/2019

Each time you have a career choice to make, consider the risk and reward, the short- and long-term outcomes, and alternative paths, writes Vicki Walia. "It is important that we be open to embracing new career opportunities, and, when the moment is right, consider taking risks and pursue some new challenges," Walia states.

Full Story:
Glassdoor
6/26/2019

If your voice and ideas are going unnoticed on the job -- maybe you're quiet or work remotely -- there are actions you can take to overcome the issue, says Robin Madell. Get noticed by following up on a problem, using visuals, making your case, telling stories, networking, and writing, Madell writes.

More Summaries:
Robin Madell
6/26/2019

The quality of your follow-up email can make a difference in whether or not you receive a reply, writes Allen Gannett. Make your email relatable, personal and short, and follow the 3x3 rule, says Gannett.

Full Story:
Fast Company online
More Summaries:
Allen Gannett
6/26/2019

You can quickly learn about the culture of your new company by searching the Slack archives, says Nick Douglas. Search your own name, the person you're replacing, and your job title to get a heads up on your new position, Douglas writes.

Full Story:
Lifehacker
More Summaries:
Nick Douglas
6/26/2019

Make sure you bring your best you into your new job, and leave the negativity from your last position behind, states Kourtney Whitehead. The bad work environment likely affected some of your personal relationships so "be sure to thank the supporters that stood by you and helped you get to this fresh start," she writes.

Full Story:
Forbes
6/26/2019

Ryne Melcher, the track and field coach at a Vancouver high school, made a bet with his students; if they won a championship title for the second year with more points than the last, he would run 100 kilometers on the school's track. The team held up their end by winning the title by 43 more points than the previous year, and Melcher kept his promise by taking 250 laps over 13 hours, with many of his athletes and community members joining in the run.

Full Story:
Runner's World online
6/26/2019

Don't expect to use HR cloud technology without needing help, writes Mark Stelzner. It is important to ask a lot of questions before buying, such as "who your support person will be, how much their services will cost and exactly what you can expect from them," he writes.

Full Story:
Voice of HR
More Summaries:
Mark Stelzner