HR & Career
Top stories summarized by our editors
2/19/2020

With an increase of single mothers in the workforce, managers and employers can use these 4 workplace changes to ease new mothers back into work, writes Ashley Stahl. An encouraging community, space for pumping, updated maternity leave policy and a reintegration period would give new mothers the support they need to get their careers back on track, she advises.

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Forbes
2/19/2020

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., asked that the 74 federal inspectors general protect whistleblowers from retaliation in the wake of President Donald Trump's impeachment hearings. He also asked the inspectors general to document when federal employees are told their legal rights about anonymously reporting misconduct.

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Yahoo
2/19/2020

Unfortunately, every company comes with lackluster employees, so author Karen Burns has 5 tips for dealing with the incompetence around you at work. Some things you can do include keeping records of communications, avoiding the urge to complain, politely making your issues known, trying to help and utilizing any of the co-worker's possible strengths.

2/19/2020

Open-plan offices have raised privacy and noise concerns among workers, and some companies have responded by creating more private spaces such as huddle or focus areas, phone booths and lactation pods, where people can get a reprieve or work quietly. Many employers have created wellness rooms for all employees, allowing for a variety of activities, including taking a nap.

2/19/2020

One way to keep office meetings productive and give everyone opportunities to contribute is by assigning roles, according to David Komlos and David Benjamin. By designating members, critics or observers, everyone is free to speak without judgment as their respective role to make the most of the meeting.

2/19/2020

In a 46-37 vote, Kickstarter employees voted Tuesday to unionize -- a first among major tech companies. The Office and Professional Employees International Union, representing the employees, says it sees the tech sector as a "new frontier for union organizing."

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The Verge
2/19/2020

A three-year HR technology contract can be a mistake because you could find out the system is the wrong fit, your needs may change, competitors' prices may go down or the vendor may not properly update the system, writes Shandel McAuliffe of Cezanne HR. "When you work with a modern HR system provider, you have the flexibility to demand much shorter contract times and pricing that goes up and down depending on your headcount," McAuliffe writes.

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HR Technologist
2/19/2020

HR departments will require ethics groups because artificial intelligence, machine learning and other technologies are affecting people's lives, predicts John Sumser, principal analyst at HRExaminer. "You have to have a solid, disciplined process for anticipating what could go wrong and making decisions in light of what could go wrong," he says.

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HCM Technology Report
2/19/2020

Improve employees' experience with talent-management technologies that include self-service features and are integrated with other systems, say software and HR tech executives. "They want to be able to send a text message to their company's AI-powered chatbot and get personalized answers at a moment's notice," says Aida Fazylova, CEO of XOR.

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HRO Today
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Aida Fazylova
2/19/2020

Data and automated technologies will challenge HR to decide where a human touch is needed and how to help employees acquire evolving skills, writes Bernard Marr. "The great news is that a lot of the AI and machine learning tools coming onto the market will allow us to automatically analyze HR data and generate valuable insights," Marr writes.

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Forbes