HR & Career
Top stories summarized by our editors
1/27/2020

Measuring your competency is important for job growth, as both overconfident and discouraged employees can hurt a company, writes Nick Wolny of Super Connector Media. To reduce imposter syndrome and continue your job growth, find productive rituals, track your work day and have proven ways to take a break that will get you back in the flow of work, he says.

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Entrepreneur online
1/27/2020

Use an exit interview to talk about good experiences you've had with a company, suggest one or two key improvements and note things that might have made you stay, writes executive coach Rebecca Zucker. "Good leaders make things better for others, and the exit interview is a small, but important, way to contribute to this aim," she writes.

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Rebecca Zucker
1/27/2020

Stepping into other workers shoes within your company can make you a better worker, says business executive Robin Moriarty. "If you want to be great at your job, get out of your office and spend time with the people in your company who are working in parts of the organization outside of your responsibility and functional area and where the rubber meets the road," she writes.

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Forbes
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Robin Moriarty
1/27/2020

Public speaking is a very common source of anxiety, and a Q&A only makes it worse for some people. "Considering your audience's perspective helps you stay calm by reminding you that you're dealing with human beings, not enemy combatants," she writes.

1/27/2020

American workers are feeling lonelier than ever, with 60% feeling like no one knows them well, according to a new Cigna survey. To avoid feeling isolated at work, get lunch with colleagues, talk to your supervisor, connect on social media and get involved in community service, writes Shira Feder.

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Insider
1/24/2020

What was perhaps a good coping mechanism in your youth, such as avoiding conflict, can hurt your career now, says Kerry Goyette of Aperio Consulting Group. "At its core, conflict avoidance uses escape or intimidation to mask insecurities and avoid having our fears, uncertainties, or mistakes exposed," she writes.

1/24/2020

Spelling and grammar mistakes, inflating your skills and inappropriate social media posts are the three most common mistakes that send your resume to the trash, according to ZipRecruiter's Ian Siegel. Make sure your have at least half the required skills for the job and be mindful of what people will find when Googling you, he says.

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CNBC
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ZipRecruiter
1/24/2020

With changing workforce trends, technology is helping to analyze candidates' behavior, cognitive abilities, personality traits and online history to find the best person for the job, rather than classic resumes and interviews. One of the changes could be self-reported skill proficiency, in which employers offer certifications to prove skills for competitive positions.

1/24/2020

To reduce stress in the workplace, M+A Architects designed a "respite room," with muted colored walls and lights, for workers to relax under a weighted blanket, meditate or color. The firm has found that it takes 20 minutes in the quiet room to reduce an employee's anxiety.

1/23/2020

Give people time and space to process critical feedback or bad news, and be prepared for a range of potential emotions, writes Farrah Mitra, an executive coach and former HR leader. "Jumping to fix-it mode may feel intuitive, but it is actually a way of deflecting and leaning away from understanding," she writes.

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Radical Candor blog