Industry News
HR & Career
Top stories summarized by our editors
3/1/2021

Avoid virtual meeting fatigue by setting a clear goal for the meeting, assigning everyone a role for the session and reflecting on what worked and didn't, writes Barry Rosen, CEO of Interaction Associates. "In analyzing data from the 2020 State of Online Meetings Report, we discovered meetings that had a clear meeting agenda usually or always met their intended goals 93% of the time," he writes.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
3/1/2021

Whenever possible, candidates should avoid immediately accepting a job offer and take at least a few days to consider it and negotiate salary and other benefits, advises the University of Pennsylvania's Joseph Barber, senior associate director of career services and a member of the Graduate Career Consortium. Barber explains how to prepare to negotiate and when not to, and offers several scenarios.

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Inside Higher Ed
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University of Pennsylvania
3/1/2021

There are many ways to get promoted from within, but it takes getting your name out there by volunteering for projects, taking note of how others handle situations and meetings and networking with colleagues and managers. "As you build connections with people you don't traditionally work with day-to-day, more opportunities -- and many that you never even thought of -- will arise," says Emily He, Oracle senior vice president.

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Fast Company online
3/1/2021

A group of 50 male business leaders, actors and athletes, including Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian and NBA star Stephen Curry, have signed an open letter calling for Congress to approve the "Marshall Plan for Moms" -- a proposal by Girls Who Code CEO Reshma Saujani to help mothers who left the workforce during the pandemic return to employment. The proposal seeks $2,400 per month in stimulus checks for mothers and reopening schools five days a week, among other stipulations.

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CNN
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Stephen Curry, Reshma Saujani, Reddit
2/26/2021

Leaders need to prepare for the workplace shuffle that will occur once the pandemic is over, especially by identifying star employees who might leave. "One of the key ways to protect your business in the event of the departure of an MVP is to equip other employees with their same skills," writes Shawn Casemore. "Cross-training, although not new, is often treated as a singular event."

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Fast Company online
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Shawn Casemore
2/26/2021

A comprehensive report by McKinsey & Company found Black workers in the US private sector might not achieve management parity for another 95 years. The study reveals 45% of Black employees work in frontline jobs, 43% earn under $30,000 per year, and Black workers are overrepresented in low job-growth locations and underrepresented in high-earning, fast-growing sectors such as IT and financial and professional services.

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HR Dive
2/26/2021

The Department of Labor issued guidance on Thursday concerning whether laid-off workers can continue to receive unemployment benefits if they turn down a job because of coronavirus safety concerns. The guidance also allows parents who quit jobs to care for their children to still receive unemployment benefits after schools reopen.

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CNN
2/25/2021

Expressing appreciation or gratitude to others can boost their spirits and contribute to their well-being, but people hold back on their compliments, unaware of the impact their words have on others, write researchers Erica Boothby, Xuan Zhao and Vanessa Bohns. "Just as people must eat regularly to satisfy their biological needs, the fundamental need to be seen, recognized, and appreciated by others, as it turns out, is a recurring need at work and in life," they write.

2/25/2021

Black employees are not proportionately represented in lucrative industries and geographic areas while also more likely to gross less than $30,000 per year, according to McKinsey research. Separately, Black and African American employees often report lower-than-average job satisfaction, although "there is no single 'Black or African American experience at work' and every company is different," write Amanda Stansell and Andrew Chamberlain for Glassdoor.

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McKinsey, Glassdoor
2/25/2021

Employee leave, workplace safety, affordable health care, employee classification, retirement plans and marijuana use are among policy and regulatory considerations for US HR executives in 2021, writes Mike Trabold, director of compliance risk for Paychex.

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HRO Today
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Mike Trabold