HR & Career
Top stories summarized by our editors
4/7/2020

"Heat experiences" -- high stress, high-stakes situations that occur during times of turbulence and change -- must be handled carefully to nurture growth and avoid turnover and burnout, writes Chris Watz of the Center for Creative Leadership. Watz offers four ways trainers and coaches can prepare their teams to handle, and benefit from, these experiences.

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Training magazine
4/6/2020

US Surgeon General Jerome Adams expects coronavirus deaths to increase this week, with the impact felt nationwide. "This is going to be our Pearl Harbor moment, our 9/11 moment, only it's not going to be localized," he says.

4/6/2020

While nobody knows how long the coronavirus pandemic will last, basic rituals like showering, shaving and dressing up for work can give workers a sense of normalcy and even help them stand out in meetings. "It's about preserving a sense of professionalism in a formless environment, where the sense of urgency is gone. I have seven to 10 Zoom meetings a day, and I feel far less prepared if I'm wearing a hoodie-and-pajamas look," says creative director Timo Weiland.

4/6/2020

The workplace will be permanently changed by the coronavirus crisis, according to organizational strategy consultant David Belden, with more teams working efficiently from home. In addition, the Trust Alliance recently discussed counseling services for employees during times of personal crises and isolation as well as other support systems to build trust among employers and employees.

4/6/2020

Instant communication tools, such as Slack and Microsoft Teams, can work against employers during times of crisis, creating distraction and serving as funnels for misinformation, writes Mike Hicks, chief marketing officer at Igloo Software. Hicks suggests that corporate intranets, emails and blogs are better ways to govern information and convey important messages to employees.

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Fast Company online
More Summaries:
Slack
4/6/2020

While everyone is adjusting to remote working, it's important for employees to stay visible and engaged, writes Shaheena Janjuha-Jivraj. To get the most out of your work, be prepared to contribute to meetings, use nonverbal communications for important interactions and give co-workers clear frameworks for projects.

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Forbes
4/6/2020

Interest in one-on-one mentorships and networking is a surprising positive to come out of the coronavirus lockdown, according to David Griner. Workers are using their newfound free time to connect via video chat to feel professionally productive, break up their isolation and explore new job opportunities.

4/6/2020

As we approach the fourth week of lockdown, it's normal for many to feel stressed, anxious or depressed, writes Jennifer Jolly. There are plenty of social media support groups and therapy apps that have been working to help people through COVID-19 stress and can answer questions about your emotional health.

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USA Today
4/3/2020

Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows a loss of 701,000 jobs in March, driving the unemployment rate to 4.4%. Barclay's US chief economist, Michael Gapen, predicts April will show more losses and that the unemployment rate could be more than 10%.

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NBC News
4/3/2020

The February unemployment rate was 3.5%, the lowest in 50 years, but is expected to reach 10% in the second quarter, according to the Congressional Budget Office on Thursday. "What usually takes months or quarters to happen in a recession is happening in a matter of weeks," said Michelle Meyer, chief U.S. economist for Bank of America Merrill Lynch.