HR & Career
Top stories summarized by our editors
11/8/2019

Prejudice against those who have accents, particularly those who may not have English as their mother tongue, can keep qualified candidates from landing a job. Those involved in hiring candidates should keep accent bias in mind as they evaluate candidates' qualifications and abilities.

11/7/2019

After a winding path through her career and unrelated college majors, Courtney Hagen is now chief talent officer at Littlejohn. Hagen says a graduate's first job won't make or break their career, but they need to do extensive research and prioritize the role rather than the company.

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Forbes
11/7/2019

To be a successful leader, show colleagues that you are multidimensional, writes Marcel Schwantes, founder of Leadership From the Core. "Self-disclose and be human -- engage in storytelling, discuss a mistake or risk you took, share an emotion -- these interactions allow others to feel more connected to you as the leader," he writes.

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Inc. online
11/7/2019

To set a calm tone in an office, stay away from bright yellow and other overwhelming colors on the walls, even if those colors match your logo. Overstimulating office spaces, common in tech startups, can actually decrease productivity, writes Anne Quito.

11/7/2019

Companies have increasingly adopted policies prohibiting managers and top executives from having relationships with employees to prevent situations similar to the one involving recently ousted McDonald's CEO Steve Easterbrook. "The #MeToo movement has shown how quickly it can go from consensual in the beginning to a huge problem when the relationship goes awry," says Debra Katz of the Katz Marshall & Banks law firm.

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The Associated Press
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Steve Easterbrook
11/7/2019

Goldman Sachs' leadership is always looking for better ways to attract and keep engineers and other top talent, says Dane Holmes, HR chief. "We know that we basically have to constantly evolve and change in order to remain that employer of choice," he says.

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Business Insider
11/7/2019

Medtronic wants its chief HR officer to work with other top executives, influence business strategy and serve as an adviser to the CEO, writes CEO Omar Ishrak and CHRO Carol Surface. "The CHRO role as outlined by this model is much richer and more complex than that of a functional leader, and we believe it captures the full potential of the CHRO and what the CEO should expect from him or her," they write.

11/7/2019

Don't take workplace frustrations personally, never rush into hiring someone just to fill a vacancy and be direct and fair with people who aren't working out, says Tom Kilroy of Merryck & Co. "Most of the time, it's obvious when you have to make a decision on a person, and you need to realize that you're being viewed as weak by others by not addressing it," he says.

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LinkedIn
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Tom Kilroy
11/7/2019

A Willis Towers Watson survey suggests that building employees' trust, sense of mission and career growth contributes more to company performance than focusing on higher pay and the work environment, writes Josh Bersin. "People don't come to work for free lunch or exercise facilities, they come to work to get something accomplished," he writes.

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Josh Bersin blog
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Willis Towers Watson
11/7/2019

Don't make assumptions about employees based on their age, and understand the differences in people's needs in a multi-generational workplace, writes Sharon Edmondson, HR vice president at IWG. "Recognizing different strengths and skills and bringing these together into blended teams is a route to success," she writes.

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HR Technologist
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IWG