Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
9/20/2019

Corporate boards have a responsibility to select top-notch CEOs, compose budgets that reflect organizational values, communicate clearly and perform under pressure, writes Joel Peterson, chairman at JetBlue Airways. "Making sure no demanding divas are allowed to drive the agenda is a final way directors can manage stress to increase, not decrease, trust levels," he writes.

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Directors and Boards
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JetBlue Airways, Joel Peterson
9/20/2019

Think about problems as opportunities, then formulate questions to gain information, to clarify and to identify what actions are available, writes Valeria Maltoni. "If instead of starting with a problem, we start with a question, we move the focus away from stuck (or denial) to discovery and potential," Maltoni writes.

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Conversation Agent
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Valeria Maltoni
9/20/2019

This photo was submitted by Karen Raskasky.

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Flickr
9/20/2019

Arnold Donald became Carnival's CEO after 12 years as a board member and has weathered numerous business challenges during his six years. He says that listening to people has been vital, including a listening tour that led directly to operational improvements. Donald also commented on the lack of diversity at large corporations: "Start with people who are diverse themselves. When I came here, I purposely engineered diversity at the top. I didn't try to program this at the entry level and hope people would percolate to the top over time."

9/20/2019

The pressure of leadership can show up in several ways, such as refusing to admit mistakes, take feedback or move on from an unworkable situation, writes Jane Perdue. "Pressure can prompt us to turn a strength -- like being knowledgeable, persevering or quickly solving problems -- into a weakness," she writes.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
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Jane Perdue
9/20/2019

Challenging, empowering and rewarding employees gives them freedom to act and explore, which builds trust and confidence, writes Justin Kanoya. "This type of leadership can result in a person being led to create the best version of themselves," he writes.

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Thin Difference
9/20/2019

Listening is about learning and perceiving, not about waiting until you can jump in, writes Lolly Daskal. "When you listen and you are able to form connections with what is being spoken, you'll find you're well prepared to help people put their thoughts in context and decide what to do next," Daskal writes.

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Lolly Daskal
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Lolly Daskal
9/20/2019

Taking a nine-day trip through Colombia with other women helped Hannah Dylan Pasternak connect with herself and manage her anxiety. "We may have homes, families, friends, and routines, but because there is a whole world out there we willfully leave for the great unknown, even if the unknown sometimes makes us anxious," she writes.

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Self
9/20/2019

Think about business as "an infinite game," which constantly presents opportunities to continue playing and where winning -- ending the game -- isn't the goal, says Simon Sinek. "To say that the responsibility of business is to maximize profit is to misunderstand the value of business," he says.

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Director
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Simon Sinek
9/20/2019

Julia Giacoboni and co-workers at a Philadelphia-based advertising agency recently celebrated seven years of a tub of cottage cheese in the office refrigerator. Giacoboni, who bought the product and didn't like it, has posted selfies with the cottage cheese, which survived a move when the company switched offices.

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CTV (Canada)