Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
3/27/2020

Turning to creative arts such as journaling, cooking, painting or reading can help ease anxiety, provide a sense of control and reveal new skills during this time of social distancing, writes Lauren Clark. "One of the joys that will arise from this current situation is that humanity will become more creative, and ... closer!" she writes.

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Thrive Global
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Lauren Clark
3/27/2020

Modus Create has seen major growth over the past five years, and much of this can be attributed to a remote-first philosophy that allows them to cultivate talent on a global scale. Modus predicts that more widespread acceptance of remote work and technology, as well as new models for financing innovation, will become prevalent.

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Technical.ly
3/27/2020

More than 1 billion children are out of school because of the coronavirus pandemic now. If yours are among them, you probably already know how disruptive they can be to your at-home workday. Experts advise parents working from home with their kids around to set up ground rules, encourage their independence, maintain flexibility when things don't go as planned -- and remember this is all temporary.

3/27/2020

Why it matters: With the footfalls having fallen silent, a maintenance crew in London took advantage of the city's shelter-in-place order to slap a fresh coat of paint on the iconic crosswalk. Well played maintenance crew, well played.

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Variety online
3/27/2020

The workplace of the future will be greatly changed by the coronavirus pandemic, writes Art Petty, with old management structures giving way to more remote work, greater collaboration and distributed decision-making. "[O]ld-line management approaches that no longer fit this era or environment must melt away quickly before they prolong our economic and human pain," he writes.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
3/27/2020

Leaders should follow the guidelines of the wilderness organization Leave No Trace by putting aside their own ego for the good of the organization, writes Mark Brown, drawing on insights from New York Life CEO Ted Mathas. Referring to the abundant resources available outdoors, Brown makes the parallel to team member creativity, encouraging leaders to fully use their potential.

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Great Leadership
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Ted Mathas
3/27/2020

The Texas-based H-E-B grocery store chain developed a strategy to handle a pandemic during the threat of H5N1 in 2005 and began implementing its plan in early January as the coronavirus took hold in China. Early on, the company started talking with suppliers, instituted limited store hours, increased employee pay and changed sick leave policies to cope with the new challenge.

3/27/2020

CEOs and other leaders must share messages of hope and guidance in addition to facts during this time of pandemic, writes Jim Ylisela. People "want to be inspired, to know that we will get through this, that we will prevail, and that we all have to care for each other, in any way we can," he writes.

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Ragan
3/27/2020

Leaders need to communicate a clear, consistent message during a crisis so people don't become paralyzed by indecision, says Carreen Winters, MWWPR's chairman of reputation and chief strategy officer. "In some cases, corporate communications leaders are the only ones thinking about audiences holistically, and pointing out mismatches between corporate strategy, priorities, and messaging," Winters says.

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MWWPR
3/27/2020

A sword at a Venetian monastery that was misidentified as a medieval relic has been found to be as much as 5,000 years old, making it one of the oldest artifacts of that nature ever discovered. The sword, noticed by Italian archaeologist Vittoria Dall'Armellina in 2017, is made from a copper and arsenic alloy that was typically used as far back as the third millennium B.C.

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CNN