Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
10/19/2018

... this is a rather excellent analysis of the financial aspects of the company everyone like to use while they "chill."

Why it matters: Netflix can't and won't keep growing forever. There is simply too much competition out there or on the way. The smartest thing Netflix boss Reed Hastings could do is splash some cash for live sporting events. Those are the golden goose of television (for now). Otherwise, Amazon is coming. Google is coming via YouTubeTV. Disney is coming. If it keeps its current course (and debt load), then winter is coming for the folks at Netflix. But at least Rachel Whetstone is at the PR helm to save them!

10/19/2018

Why it matters: Ian Bremmer, the president and founder of Eurasia Group, is one of the smartest geopolitical minds on the planet. He does an excellent job of recapping what we know about the Khashoggi affair (at this point) and what it all means.

As an aside, this is the first of a series of columns Bremmer is writing for TIME. Let's just say I noticed something very familiar about how he formatted it.

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TIME magazine
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Ian Bremmer, Eurasia Group
10/19/2018

I am a big fan of renewable sources of energy like wind and solar. And before you go hammering me for being some extreme environmentalist, just know that the CEOs of companies like ExxonMobil and Chevron agree that renewables are part of the "energy mix." And the fact that a rather large airport (1,000 flights a day) can be run on solar energy is a sunny, real-life example of that energy mix. Let the planes run on fossil fuels while the airport runs on solar.

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Green Matters
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ExxonMobil, Chevron
10/19/2018

As former Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld once said, "You go to war with the Army that you have." Part of making sure you have the best military possible involves taking care of the people you have. The US military is losing talented officers because it isn't doing a good enough job of managing them. At least the military recognizes it has a problem. Here's hoping they get it sorted out on the double.

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Donald Rumsfeld, Army
10/19/2018

Apparently the chef at a school cafeteria served the students kangaroo meat.

10/19/2018

People who work in economics and public policy are probably familiar with the "Kansas Plan." No, I am not talking about the overtime system for football games. I am talking about the fiscal and social policies put in place by the state of Kansas.



At some point this weekend, dive into this Bloomberg piece. Not just the article itself, but also the data sources and links. Then ask yourself if you'd want your state - or your country - to embrace the Kansas Plan.

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Bloomberg, football
10/18/2018

The airline industry is an example of how offering clear pricing tiers, starting with a cheap option that offers little or no perks, sets customer expectations and helps them decide whether to spend more, write Thomas A. Stewart and Patricia O'Connell. "By creating a class of service many passengers shun, basic economy appears to have made ordinary service seem less bad," they write.

10/18/2018

Thousands of companies are offering subscription boxes, and the most successful combine the element of surprise with secondary revenue streams, writes Elizabeth Segran. Ipsy makes advertising revenue from YouTube videos showing how to use its beauty products, Sephora Play seeks to drive customers to shop with the core brand and FabFitFun sells sponsorships from brands seeking to reach new customers.

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Fast Company online
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Elizabeth Segran, YouTube, Ipsy, FabFitFun
10/18/2018

The worst part about success is that it can stall our learning, as we become overconfident and stop listening to other people, LaRae Quy writes. "To become an expert means that we move the marker down the line to show progress has been made," she writes.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
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LaRae Quy
10/18/2018

Federal Reserve policymakers agree they should keep raising interest rates, according to meeting minutes, rejecting President Donald Trump's criticism that rates have increased too much. The rate-setting committee says increasing short-term interest rates "would most likely be consistent" with expected economic growth, the minutes show.

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Reuters, CNBC