Industry News
Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
7/8/2020

Leaders need to be patient, open-minded and specific when trying to resolve conflict or change an employee's behavior, writes Marlene Chism. She offers three actions to take, including exploring your assumptions and owning your role in the problem.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
7/8/2020

Restaurants face challenges as they reopen their dining rooms with new safety practices in place to reassure customers and new rules on wearing masks and social distancing that can be difficult to force diners to follow. "I think the challenge they have now is ... getting the public to think the same way, to get comfortable with keeping six feet apar t... and to wear the face coverings," said Larry Lynch, The National Restaurant Association's senior vice president of certification and operations.

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Larry Lynch
7/8/2020

Ease the stress and anxiety of this pandemic by examining your feelings and acting only after pausing to ground yourself, writes Liz Kislik. "[Y]ou'll feel more tolerant and patient, so you can hear out the various players, ask incisive questions, and gather more data to bring to the table so you can see what's going on," she writes.

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Liz Kislik Associates
7/8/2020

Businesses looking to adjust to pandemic-created conditions should ensure they're choosing actions that align with strengths and capabilities, writes Mauro Guillen. Such changes must eventually lead to profit and should embrace concepts such as "shorter value chains, remote work, social distancing, consumer introspection, and enhanced technology use," he writes.

7/8/2020

McDonald's has a complicated relationship with Black communities, says Georgetown University professor and author Marcia Chatelain, who notes that the company provides many jobs but not sustainable wages. "Once you say, Black Lives Matter, the next question is, how will you show that in your practices?" Chatelain says.

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Forbes
7/8/2020

Midyear conversations are more productive when employees are prepared to talk about goals and when leaders are ready with insightful questions that spur ideas for improvement, writes Kevin Eikenberry. "Both parties should leave this conversation knowing what they can do to sustain and improve performance in pursuit of your goals," he writes.

7/8/2020

Segmenting customers by whether they wear face masks can help you identify how to tailor messaging and services, say Colin Shaw and Emory University professor Ryan Hamilton in this podcast. They identify five such segments.

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Beyond Philosophy
7/8/2020

HomeServe HR leader Kate Keyworth was taught as a child to learn from bad experiences rather than dwell on them. She uses that advice to hire leaders "who've proven that they can deal with ambiguity and can operate outside their comfort zone in increasing areas of grayness."

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LinkedIn
7/8/2020

Strangers are just as good at picking the attributes of a romantic partner for us as we are, according to a study. Lead author Jehan Sparks says rather than obsess over idealized traits, "let your friends pick your dates."

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New York Post
7/8/2020

The Supreme Court has ruled 7-2 that employers can cite religious or moral reasons for rejecting access to contraceptive coverage for their employees as required by the Affordable Care Act. With Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Sonia Sotomayor dissenting, the high court remanded the matter with the expectation that further litigation will emerge in the case.

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CNBC