Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
1/27/2020

ESG funds only accounted for about 0.4% of the ETF industry in 2019, based on available data, but that figure is expected to grow rapidly in 2020, especially with the support of industry leaders such as Blackrock's Larry Fink, Bob Pisani writes. ESG investing will face challenges due to its inconsistent scalability, notes Ben Johnson of Morningstar.

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CNBC
1/27/2020

PwC improved its workforce, services and audits through technology, focusing on the benefits of robotics, artificial intelligence and analytics. "The goal is to free up a lot of time for auditors to do the human things that they need to do and democratize innovation," says Sherri Guidone, the company's US Assurance Technology Leader.

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ZDNet
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PwC
1/27/2020

Companies transitioning to 5G networks could learn valuable lessons from the experience of data centers that relied on commercial off-the-shelf solutions only to experience security concerns and an inability to customize their systems. Using an open infrastructure approach geared to interoperability will save time and improve effectiveness, writes Steve Papa of Parallel Wireless.

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IT Pro
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Steve Papa
1/27/2020

Technology such as artificial intelligence, big data, the internet of things and the cloud will become more mainstream and accessible to all in the coming decade, provided the workforce is trained with the necessary skill sets, according to Debjani Ghosh. The technology will enhance productivity rather than erode it, Ghosh writes.

1/27/2020

Why it matters: Ten years ago today, Apple's Steve Jobs introduced a new product that essentially created a new category of device between the smartphone and the laptop. While the iPad may not have completely erased the computer from the collective consciousness of young people, as Apple implied it could in a 2018 ad, you can argue it has changed the way people view tablets. 

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Wired online (UK)
1/27/2020

Why it matters: Scientists have been leveraging tidal energy for decades, but the global discourse around renewable energy today focuses a lot on solar and wind power. However, tidal energy is starting to generate more interest, and a pilot project in the UK is a prime example. In 2019, an array of turbines off the coast of Scotland exported enough gigawatt hours of energy to power about 3,800 average homes in the UK. If the pilot project continues its success, it could inspire other parts of the world to follow suit.

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CNBC
1/27/2020

Why it matters: Over the past few years, the ketogenic diet has garnered equal parts praise and skepticism. It turns out both views are correct. According to new research out of Yale, the keto diet had positive short-term health effects on mice, but adversely affected them after about a week.

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Futurity
1/27/2020

Why it matters: In recent years, scientists have been finding ways to improve the manufacture of graphene - a so-called "wonder" material that has a wide range of potential applications. A researcher at Rice University has found a way to quickly and inexpensively convert coal, food waste or plastic into graphene. Remember that story we included in WYWW on Thursday about food waste? What if we could turn that waste into a usable building material? 

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PhysOrg
1/27/2020

Why it matters: Seventeen days ago, one of the stories in the UN Wire newsletter I edit talked about a "new coronavirus" that had infected 59 people. A week later, it had become the top story with 2 deaths and today it remained the top story with cases reported in 12 more countries and a death toll flirting with 100. Wuhan, China, where the virus first emerged, set out to build a hospital in six days to deal with the demand for diagnosis and treatment. Since the this infection may turn out to be more contagious than SARS, it's worth the scramble to try to get things under control. --Paula

1/27/2020

Why it matters: If you wanted a scientific way to measure how bad traffic is in parts of Florida, you could find some statistics by a credible research group. If you'd rather measure it anecdotally, look no further than Cape Coral, where a group of friends were at a red light long enough to set up a table in the middle of the road and finished a game of Uno. The WYWW team does NOT recommend playing Uno in the middle of the street. We prefer Yahtzee.