Industry News
Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
9/29/2020

CEOs can improve their creativity in simple ways, including regular reading, having a diverse team and putting breaks on their calendar, writes Design Pickle CEO Russ Perry. "Set aside daily reading time, but don't worry about choosing a particular genre," he writes.

9/29/2020

A German-language operating manual has been discovered for the Zuse Z4, a computer built in 1945 that's considered the oldest surviving device of its kind. The room-sized machine was used during the early 1950s to make calculations of rocket trajectories, aircraft wings and other military operations, writes Herbert Bruderer.

9/29/2020

So-called "take home" cases common in asbestos litigation could provide a template for similar suits brought by workers that may have brought the coronavirus home and spread it to others. Such cases could cost US businesses $21 billion if the death toll reaches 300,000, according to Praedicat.

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Reuters
9/29/2020

The events of 2020 have forced leaders in every industry to reevaluate their leadership strategies amid workplace shutdowns, spikes (or slumps) in demand, and new challenges facing their companies and their teams. Tactics used by grief management experts that can help leaders more effectively support their teams include resisting platitudes, actively listening to feedback and bringing staff together in a shared community space.

9/29/2020

Why it matters: This paper is a "must-read" for anyone who cares about Alzheimer's disease. We often think of the emotional toll the disease can take, but this piece weighs how economics can impact innovations related to prevention, medicines and delivery of care. Even if you don't have time to read the whole paper, the abstract might make you think about aspects of Alzheimer's you've never considered.

The cognitively challenged consumer: One of the many interesting elements this paper explores is how the law and market pressures might drive how companies treat cognitively challenged consumers. There are loads of laws that address how companies must treat physically challenged consumers, but not too many that deal with the treatment of the cognitively challenged.

9/29/2020

Why it matters: The smart people at CERN have joined the effort to develop computing, communication, sensing and simulation devices that leverage phenomena such as superposition and entanglement. The impact such quantum technologies might have on society remains to be seen, but CERN aims to be at the center of the research effort.

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PhysOrg
9/29/2020

Why it matters: Coconut, almond, rice and soy ... oh boy!

OK, so there isn't an actual milk war taking place, but lots of varieties are competing for market share. This piece does a good job of explaining the specifics of each offering.

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The Conversation
9/29/2020

Why it matters: The world seems to be getting smaller, but that doesn't mean it's always easy to find a person -- even when you have their address. Google's push to give everyone an address via a universal system is great and all, but the addresses aren't as easy to remember as the ones created by What3Words (which is still one of the most-popular links in WYWW history).

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Google's The Keyword
9/29/2020

Why it matters: This new podcast tackles the psychology of a man who has been a mysterious figure for decades. He's known for being a good guy, but also known for lurking in the shadows. In fact, he spends much of his time hiding out in a secret cave tinkering with an array of gadgets and weapons. How he affords all those weapons and gadgets is sometimes hinted at, but never fully explained -- leaving some to wonder what kind of financial shenanigans he might employ to fund his puzzling lifestyle. Who is this man? He's an enigma wrapped in a riddler. He's Batman.

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TechRadar
9/29/2020

Why it matters: Juuuuust in case your coffee maker has been kidnapped and/or might be demanding a ransom, here's a list of coffee outlets offering a free cup o' joe.

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Detroit Free Press