Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
10/19/2018

Conversations are conduits of influence, so we should use them to build up others and spark positive solutions to project or interpersonal work problems, writes Cheri Torres. Instead of getting frustrated, try asking open-ended questions when you see a colleague is frustrated or when a problem is complex and seems intractable.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
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Cheri Torres
10/19/2018

Leaders can't eliminate uncertainty, so they must learn to navigate it by instilling a team-first approach rather than the traditional hierarchical, one-man-knows-best approach, Chris Lewis argues.

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Great Leadership
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Chris Lewis
10/19/2018

Employees who are eager to please often take on too much work, which is all the more reason for CEOs and other leaders to establish clear goals for their teams, writes Joel Trammell, CEO of Black Box Network Services. "Once an employee truly understands the mission and strategy, he or she has a powerful sorting tool for incoming requests," he writes.

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Khorus blog
10/19/2018

Digital transformation isn't much different from overall strategy -- it should zero in on what sets a company apart and helps customers access that service or product, writes Nigel Fenwick of Forrester. "Ninety percent of your business is simply not that unique -- stop pretending that it is," he writes.

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Forrester
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Nigel Fenwick, Forrester
10/19/2018

Watch for other people's body language to detect how they are feeling toward you, and use that knowledge to adjust your own body language toward them, say authors James Pyle and Maryann Karinch. "Your body language is a response to them that is designed to get them into the state of mind you desire," they say.

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Maryann Karinch
10/19/2018

Sometimes an impromptu break can give us energy even as we're being active, writes Laura Vanderkam, who describes the benefits of a trip to the zoo with her children. "In other words, in the strange calculus of the energy equation, doing something can be more recharging than trying to do nothing," she writes.

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Laura Vanderkam
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Laura Vanderkam
10/19/2018

There's money to be made taking surveys online, but not much, writes Diane Shipley, who spent parts of 30 days filling out such forms. She only earned $34.77, failing to meet her goal of covering her phone bill.

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The Billfold
10/19/2018

Why it matters: The trade war between the US and China often gets suffocated out of the news cycle because talk of tariffs on all manner of goods from steel to soybeans isn't sexy. The end result is that Americans don't even seem to understand how tariffs work. The reality is that the trade war is already hurting lots of Americans. Exhibit A would be the billions of dollars the US government is spending to bail out farmers. News that the trade war is escalating at the World Trade Organization, which moves at a notoriously slow pace, means relief isn't coming anytime soon.

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Reuters
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World Trade Organization
10/19/2018

Why it matters: Facebook now understands that its battles against policymakers and public relations fiascos will be an ongoing thing. The good news for Facebook is that Clegg will be replacing a different well-connected Brit who seemed to attract PR nightmares wherever she went - Rachel Whetstone. Whetstone has now left Google, Uber and Facebook in worse communications situations than she found them. In fact, Recode recently reported Whetstone had "come to Facebook to avoid the many thorny challenges she had dealt with in previous jobs." So she is a PR exec who doesn't want to work on PR challenges. Grrrrrreat.

Oh ... and where is Whetstone working now? Netflix. Good luck with that, Reed!

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Reuters
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Facebook, Clegg, Reed, Netflix, Google
10/19/2018

... this is a rather excellent analysis of the financial aspects of the company everyone like to use while they "chill."

Why it matters: Netflix can't and won't keep growing forever. There is simply too much competition out there or on the way. The smartest thing Netflix boss Reed Hastings could do is splash some cash for live sporting events. Those are the golden goose of television (for now). Otherwise, Amazon is coming. Google is coming via YouTubeTV. Disney is coming. If it keeps its current course (and debt load), then winter is coming for the folks at Netflix. But at least Rachel Whetstone is at the PR helm to save them!