Industry News
Educational Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
7/23/2021

Sharif El-Mekki, CEO of the Center for Black Educator Development, during a recent virtual session of the National Principals Conference called on school leaders to ask themselves about ways they haven't advocated strongly for change and what they can do this year to create more equity. El-Mekki and high-school Principal Richard Gordon also discussed the importance of providing individualized learning pathways and preparing and recruiting more teachers of color.

Full Story:
K-12 Dive
More Summaries:
Richard Gordon
7/23/2021

East Harlem middle-school students cooked up s'mores using a solar oven during New York City's free Summer Rising program. Teacher Dayrin Barrios says that program staff crafted this year's curriculum with an eye to bridge learning gaps from the previous year while also offering opportunities for socialization and fun.

Full Story:
Spectrum News
7/23/2021

Modest pay rates, extensive training requirements and other qualifications are among the factors school leaders cite as barriers to recruiting enough school bus drivers. Districts are turning to job fairs, recruiters, social media and word-of-mouth to bring new drivers on board.

7/23/2021

Alabama fifth-grade teacher Amber Moore is crafting lesson plans for the upcoming year that include a review of fourth-grade concepts to account for any learning gaps that may persist. Moore is planning to resume hands-on learning, but will keep some aspects of the virtual classroom that proved to be effective.

7/22/2021

There are three ways that educators can help students affected by poverty and personal issues -- unstable housing, food insecurity, absent parents -- overcome these hurdles and change their academic trajectory, Khan Academy founder and CEO Sal Khan says. In a recent interview with SmartBrief, Khan talks about how mastery, learning autonomy and resources in the classroom can help these students achieve better outcomes and work toward a more successful future.

Full Story:
SmartBrief/Education
More Summaries:
Sal Khan
7/22/2021

Middle-school students in the Salem, Ore., area learned to prepare a meal from scratch using outdoor grills and some ingredients grown by agriculture students during a Farm to Fork summer camp. The Salem-Keizer School District supported this and other summer learning programs to give students the chance to socialize while learning new skills.

7/22/2021

Schools can use the US Education Department's 2020 Title IX rules as "minimum steps," and can take actions that "go beyond," but don't conflict, with the regulations or with the Title IX law, according to the department's "Questions and Answers on the Title IX Regulations on Sexual Harassment" guidance. The Biden administration has undertaken a comprehensive review of rules related to the Title IX law.

Full Story:
Education Week
7/22/2021

Middle-school students planned a video game, built a city from recycled materials, and brushed up on their reading, math and science skills during the Quincy, Mass., school district's Summer Scene program. Program topics are determined in part by student interests, said fourth-grade teacher Katie Che.

7/22/2021

The Mississippi State Board of Education voted to resume in-person learning as the primary method for teaching and state assessments in all school districts for 2021-22, and outlined different rules for any virtual learning days and districts' separate virtual schools. The board noted that public schools' will use COVID-19 guidance from the Mississippi State Department of Health.

7/22/2021

Thirty-three South Carolina school districts may provide virtual learning options for families that want them now that the State Board of Education has approved their e-learning plans, which call for certified teachers, partial synchronous learning and frequent parental check-ins, among other requirements. The board will review other districts' plans at its meeting next month.

More Summaries:
State Board of Education