Educational Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
10/9/2018

Language arts teachers Leesa Robertson, Barbara Haight and Linda Lobue had all their seventh- and eighth-grade students at a Hawaii middle school perform poems during the annual Literacy Night. Students spent three weeks learning about poetry and how to perform their pieces, an activity that helps connect students to the oral storytelling culture of the island.

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Hawaii middle school
10/9/2018

College and university chief diversity officers should be working closely with chief financial officers to "intentionally fund and support" campus diversity efforts, says Clyde Wilson Pickett, chief diversity officer for the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities system. During a recent retreat hosted by the system, he said such partnerships can help retain both students and faculty.

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Minnesota State Colleges, Jr.
10/9/2018

Sixth-grader Natalie Hartland got her Ohio school to offer an exploratory club for students interested in writing. She wrote a letter to her principal last year asking for the club and outlining the benefits that such a program could offer to students.

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Ohio school
10/9/2018

A study shows that colleges and universities tend to reward and promote faculty whose research remains within a range that benefits the institution more than the public good. Researchers studying institutional policy statements found that they often discourage faculty from pursuing too much public engagement in their research.

10/8/2018

One New Jersey school district is mandating that teachers and students abstain from using any technology, including school-issued Chromebooks, for four days during the school year. Teachers say on tech-free days they'll use card and board games as well as outdoor activities to keep students engaged.

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New Jersey school district
10/8/2018

Massachusetts high-school assistant principal Daniel O'Brien says he's looking forward to building relationships with students, staff and faculty in his new role. O'Brien, a former teacher and middle-school administrator, says he's been impressed by the passion and dedication he's seen among staff and faculty.

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Wicked Local
10/8/2018

Dillard University President Walter Kimbrough says even though controversial speakers may cost colleges and universities hundreds of thousands of dollars to protect, it's important to host diverse voices. Kimbrough says leaders must be prepared for such visits and engage with security personnel and monitor social media to prepare for any large protests.

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MarketWatch
10/8/2018

A report from the Economic Policy Institute shows that since the recession began in 2007 there are 116,000 fewer public education jobs available. Since education-related job creation has lagged despite class size growth, the report calculates there is "a 389,000 job shortfall in public education."

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MarketWatch
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Economic Policy Institute
10/8/2018

Avoid using ultimatums in a salary negotiation, as they usually backfire and can damage your reputation, Steven Lindner points out. By being polite and respectful you can turn a no into a yes now or in the future while also maintaining your positive reputation.

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CNBC
10/8/2018

State data show that West Virginia schools still have 700 teaching jobs open this year and many districts are using substitutes to fill the roles. District leaders say they're partnering with local colleges to find more teachers but still have shortages in areas such as special education and math.