Higher Ed
Top stories summarized by our editors
6/25/2019

Lawmakers in California are expected to sign off on a bill that would create a statewide education data system that would track children from infancy until they are adults entering the workforce. Officials say the Cradle to Career Data System would help policymakers by gathering data on student outcomes.

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EdSource
6/25/2019

A new PayScale survey show two-thirds of workers say they regret earning a college degree with the high amount of debt they incurred cited as the top reason. Those who were most satisfied with their degrees were working in technology fields with humanities degree-holders being the least pleased.

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CBS News
6/25/2019

Rachel Lehman, University of California at Irvine's remedial math lecturer, last year began a program to help online students connect with one another through small groups. Active Learning Office Hours and Assignments -- or Aloha -- allows students to meet in person while those off campus can join in through live video.

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University of California
6/25/2019

More four-year colleges and universities are adopting a skills mapping process to more closely align workforce demands with current curricula, especially among humanities majors. Amber Garrison Duncan, strategy director at the Lumina Foundation, says institutions can begin with one area of curricula, identify needed workforce skills, and then apply them across the board.

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Education Dive
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Lumina Foundation
6/25/2019

As many as 40% more of Virginia's graduating seniors would be ready to enter state colleges and universities if the state provided free universal SAT or ACT exams, according to a new study. Many colleges have ended a requirement for such exams, but researchers say their data showed that universal testing increased access for low-income students who may not be able to afford to take the tests.

6/25/2019

As California colleges and universities are running out of space for the state's high-school graduates, institutions from areas around the country with shrinking enrollments are working to recruit California students. For students who prefer to stay in state, colleges such as Pennsylvania State University are marketing their online classes as an alternative.

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The Hechinger Report
6/25/2019

The University of Tennessee at Martin will use a $22 million gift -- the largest ever received by the institution -- to fund more than 90 scholarships for students from select counties in the state. The money was donated by alumnus Bill Nunnelly and his wife, Rosann.

6/25/2019

Online and blended classes can be a major part of higher education's revamping of its business model to boost enrollment and revenue, write Edward Maloney, executive director of Georgetown's Center for New Designs in Learning and Scholarship, and Joshua Kim of the Dartmouth Center for the Advancement of Learning. "Whatever the path forward, campus digital learning leaders should be key partners in thinking of ways that undergraduate education can be reimagined," they note in this blog post.

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Inside Higher Ed
6/25/2019

To remain relevant, colleges and universities in the US and abroad must embrace flexible learning environments and incorporate more virtual and artificial-intelligence tools, writes University of Newcastle professor John Fischetti. "Virtually every academic program should be formatted to embrace new ways of learning," he suggests in this commentary.

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The Conversation (US)
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University of Newcastle
6/25/2019

As colleges and universities face mergers, new digital technology and other disruptions, leaders need to remember that people are at the center of any equation, speakers said at the recent UB Tech conference. "Most of our issues are not tech-related, but are process and people challenges," said Nassar Nizami, senior vice president and chief information officer at Thomas Jefferson University.

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Thomas Jefferson University