Higher Ed
Top stories summarized by our editors
7/16/2019

Two Republican-sponsored US Senate measures would expand Pell Grants to job-training and alternative certificate programs and require colleges and universities to pay off 50% of defaulted student loans. Sponsor Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., says the bills are intended "to address the concentration of power that has accumulated in the higher education space."

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The Hill
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Bills, Pell, Sen. Josh Hawley, Senate
7/16/2019

Louisiana education officials are hoping the Complete LA program will boost the state's college completion rate by bringing more dropouts back into the classroom. The program helps returning student cut through admissions red tape to make reentry to school easier, but does not offer tuition assistance.

7/16/2019

The American Council on Education and several other education groups have sent a letter to US Education Secretary Betsy DeVos asking for more guidance on the department's stepped-up scrutiny of foreign funding on US college campuses. Deputy Education Secretary Mick Zais says compliance with the rules may affect whether schools receive some discretionary grants from the department.

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Politico
7/16/2019

The University of North Dakota is focusing on expanding its online course offerings as on-campus enrollment declines, says Jeff Holm, the university's vice provost for online education and strategic planning. Holm says the school is focusing on branding and marketing to show students its programs are unique and academically rigorous.

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University of North Dakota
7/16/2019

Providing low-cost online education at a sustainable scale will require adjustments from platform providers, faculty and program developers, writes Joshua Kim, director of digital learning initiatives at the Dartmouth Center for the Advancement of Learning. "These programs can be engines of opportunity for thousands -- and even millions -- of adult working professionals," he notes in this blog post.

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Inside Higher Ed
7/16/2019

A survey from Gallup and Northeastern University shows that 70% of working adults say they would seek on-the-job training to attain skills in artificial-intelligence technology, with only 28% saying they would pursue a program offered by a college or university. The majority say cost and time commitments would keep them from entering a college program.

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Campus Technology
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Northeastern University, Gallup
7/15/2019

It will take a 2017 college graduate in the US an average of nearly six years to catch up in salary with their peers who entered the workforce directly after college, according to an analysis. The shortest break-even point of 2.9 years was for college graduates in San Jose, Calif., while the longest -- 85 years -- was in Logan, Utah, the data shows.

7/15/2019

Job seekers can use a cover letter and resume to explain a gap in their career for reasons such as raising a family or taking care of health matters, writes Nick Douglas. Candidates also can arrange their resume by expertise instead of chronologically, but they should never lie on a resume and should be ready to talk frankly about employment breaks, he recommends.

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Lifehacker
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Nick Douglas
7/15/2019

College and K-12 students this year are expected to spend $52.96 billion on supplies, which is .26% less than they spent in 2018, according to a Deloitte survey. However, spending on technology is expected to increase with computers and hardware making up the second-largest category behind school-specific supplies such as textbooks and lab equipment for spending by college students, the survey shows.

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Fortune
7/15/2019

Community-college students who take out fewer student loans are more likely to do worse academically than peers who borrowed more, according to a new study. Students with lower levels of borrowing -- whether they graduate or not -- also are more likely to default, the data shows.

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Inside Higher Ed