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Top stories summarized by our editors
9/21/2020

The president of the University of North Carolina system now may add two of his own candidates to a list of possible chancellors for the 17 campuses rather than having to select just from those put forward by the governing board. While many faculty members call the move a "dangerous expansion of powers," some of the board members who voted in favor say it could help reduce conflict between the chancellors and president.

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Education Dive
9/21/2020

Allan Hancock College, a Hispanic-serving institution in Santa Maria, Calif., has received two US Education Department grants totaling more than $4.2 million. One grant will apply to eight programs aimed at first-generation college students, people with disabilities and low-income individuals, while a Title V grant will focus on helping underrepresented students develop skills and complete college.

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US Education Department
9/21/2020

An Association of American Colleges and Universities survey of college and university presidents following Black Lives Matter protests sought details on efforts to achieve racial justice and address racism on campuses, writes AACU President Lynn Pasquerella. The organization is partnering with colleges and universities to work together to "break down racial hierarchies and dismantle the belief in the hierarchy of human value," Pasquerella writes.

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President Lynn Pasquerella
9/21/2020

The coronavirus pandemic has created a sharper divide between tenure-track and adjunct professors at some universities, with the former receiving research extensions and being able to offer classes safely via livestream, while the latter -- if they haven't lost their jobs -- are doing most of the in-person teaching, often without health insurance and other benefits. Adjuncts who are able to teach online are doing double the work, thanks to the course re-creation learning curve, and still risking pay cuts or job loss.

9/18/2020

Temporary, on-campus quarantines can break the coronavirus transmission chain if students strictly follow the rules and if universities support those students and adopt contact tracing and data analysis, some experts say. However, Anita Barkin of the American College Health Association's Covid-19 Task Force notes that schools lifting quarantines must continue preventative measures such as face masks, hand-washing and avoiding crowds to avoid new outbreaks and lockdowns.

9/18/2020

Collaboration in academic research can serve to improve a project's efficiency as well as enhance researchers' careers, write Delia Dumitrica, associate professor, at Erasmus University Rotterdam, and Georgia Gaden Jones, an instructor at the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology in Calgary. A key benefit is improving skills rooted in interactions, trust and a willingness to look beyond your own ideas, as are opportunities to get funding, further scholarship work and divvy up the workload, they explain.

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Inside Higher Ed
9/18/2020

Harvard, MIT and Yale still top the Wall Street Journal's 2021 Best Colleges in America list, and Duke and Carnegie Mellon each rose five spots, the new rankings released Thursday show. The University of Michigan has risen four spots to 23rd place and is the highest-ranked public university.

9/18/2020

There is a growing interest in postsecondary training and education among working adults, a poll by Strada's Center for Consumer Insights shows. While 59% of respondents questioned the value of more education, 64% said they thought it might help them get a job, the results showed.

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Inside Higher Ed
9/18/2020

Making diversity part of your brand instead of an afterthought, encouraging active recruiting and taking a fresh approach to your definition of "qualified" can help university leaders improve faculty diversity, university deans Gracie Lawson-Borders and David Perlmutter write. In this commentary, they detail these and five other ways to make headway.

9/18/2020

Financially healthy community colleges could help millions of displaced workers seek new careers with middle-class wages, but years of budget cuts have propelled a growing share of job-training students to for-profit colleges that yield worse results for graduates, David Deming of the Harvard Kennedy School writes in this commentary. Government help could make a huge difference, as did a Labor Department program allowing Broward College in Florida to enhance its curriculum with industry certifications, Deming writes.