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Higher Ed
Top stories summarized by our editors
10/21/2020

Over the past few years there have been lots of tools for flipping a classroom or lesson. Now there's a wider variety of tools, especially ones that can be used for remote/distance learning due to the worldwide pandemic.

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Tech & Learning
10/21/2020

What's esports all about? According to Lori Bajorek, president of the National Esports Association, competitive gaming is more than just a hobby; it's a catalyst for the development of life skills for a whole generation of young people.

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Tech & Learning
10/21/2020

Wednesday, October 21, 2020  - 3:30 p.m. ET; 2:30 p.m. CT; 12:30 p.m. PT
In this webinar, district leaders will discuss how they are using technology to make sure all students are not just connected, but engaged in lessons. Attendees will get tips on making the most of the technology they have and learn about new tools that can improve the delivery of instruction. Register now

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Tech & Learning
10/20/2020

Some colleges report that first-generation students and those from low-income households have been less likely to enroll this year, and officials say more awareness is needed around available financial aid programs to prevent learning loss and a future workforce with less earning power. However, some university leaders say the crisis is leading to disruption and innovation that could improve access and affordability in higher education.

10/20/2020

The proteges aren't the only ones benefiting in mentoring relationships, as the mentors gain or improve upon valuable leadership skills during the interactions, according to eight months of research by Mostafa Ayoobzadeh and Kathleen Boies of Concordia University. Being a mentor can increase confidence as well as interpersonal, communication and problem-solving abilities, the researchers write.

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The Conversation
10/20/2020

The shift to online learning has resulted for many in stress, anxiety, depression, eyestrain and decreased immunity -- all of which can result in lifelong afflictions -- and it has been especially harsh for women, experts say. Ray Schroeder, a senior fellow at UPCEA, urges college officials to create a supportive environment to try to minimize the toll on mental health.

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upcea.edu
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Ray Schroeder, UPCEA
10/20/2020

Shoreline Community College in Washington has become the nation's first to offer a certificate program aimed at training social workers to effectively work alongside or instead of police officers in potentially volatile mental health situations. The 15-credit program includes psychology, criminal justice, sociology and law and is taught by a forensic social worker who also works with law enforcement on crisis intervention.

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MyNorthwest (Seattle)
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Shoreline Community College
10/20/2020

The US Chamber of Commerce, along with several other business groups and universities, has sued the Trump administration, arguing that planned changes to H-1B visa rules "undermine high-skilled immigration in the U.S." and would "devastate companies across various industries." The proposed rules aim to make it more difficult for skilled workers to gain US employment visas.

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The Hill
10/20/2020

Several Christian colleges have reduced or frozen tuition -- a trend that's expected to continue even after the pandemic subsides, Bethel University researcher Daniel Nelson says. University leaders such as Nathan Mouttet of Seattle Pacific University are banking on the more appealing price tag sparking higher enrollment to balance out the top-line reduction.

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The Christian Post
10/20/2020

Many education experts and observers are concerned about what might happen to continuing and higher education if President Donald Trump wins a second term, considering the sweeping deregulation and dismantling of programs that took place during his administration. Others, however, applaud Trump's efforts to increase skill improvement and job changes through certificate programs, continuing education and professional development, thus recognizing people who may neither want nor need four years of college.

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Inside Higher Ed