Higher Ed
Top stories summarized by our editors
10/15/2019

Technology, such as smart cities, will change how those with liberal arts degrees will do their jobs in the future, but the degree will still be valuable, writes Jim Fong, director of UPCEA's Center for Research and Strategy. He cites a UPCEA survey that found that most smart city and innovation leaders say they will need employees with problem-solving, communication and coaching skills.

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upcea.edu
10/15/2019

A federal judge in San Francisco said she is "deeply disturbed" that the US Education Department has not complied with a 2018 order to forgive student loans of former Corinthian College students and instead has continued to collect payments and garnish wages. US Magistrate Judge Sallie Kim has ordered both sides to file briefs before her final decision on whether to hold Education Secretary Betsy DeVos in contempt of court.

10/14/2019

Data from the US Education Department's National Center for Education Statistics show the tally of for-profit and two-year public colleges has dropped, with the overall number of institutions eligible to grant federal aid falling 5.6% from 2018. In addition, data from Federal Student Aid show the number of students defaulting on loans dropped for the second year.

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US Education Department
10/14/2019

Build resilience into a career by cultivating a wide network to provide a safety net if a job doesn't work out and see all setbacks as opportunities to advance, writes business coach Caroline Castrillon. Being a lifelong learner and managing your career like a business can also help you be clear on where you want to go in your professional life.

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Forbes
10/14/2019

Dual-career couples can thrive at home and at work by talking about their dissatisfaction, formulating solutions together and keeping one another accountable, writes INSEAD Associate Professor Jennifer Petriglieri. "Couples need to develop the habit of having conversations about what really matters to them and how they are going to support each other's ambitions," she writes in this commentary.

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Jennifer Petriglieri
10/14/2019

A study of more than 100,000 New York public-school students who graduated in 2012 or 2013 shows 65% of those who took college-level courses while in high school earned a degree in 2018, compared to 55% of students who didn't take such courses. The data from Ed Trust focused on low-income students who received aid from the state Tuition Assistance Program.

10/14/2019

Rural colleges in California, Texas and Indiana are using creative initiatives to recruit students including accelerated degree programs, online class enrollment and more academic support, according to a report from the Institute for Higher Education Policy. Officials in those areas see the recruitment as crucial to developing workforce skills.

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Education Dive
10/14/2019

Increasing salaries and making an institutional commitment to boosting diversity could help attract a more diverse faculty, writes Delgado Community College adjunct instructor Lee Hedgepeth. In this commentary, Hedgepeth says boosting diversity will require "a holistic approach."

10/14/2019

Real estate developer David Walentas and his wife, Jane, have donated $100 million to the University of Virginia to fund scholarships for first-generation college students. Walentas, who earned an undergraduate and MBA at the university, was the first of his family to attend college and he says the experience "completely changed my life."

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University of Virginia
10/11/2019

Colleges and universities are increasingly using mergers and acquisitions to shore up their finances and streamline their offerings amid declining enrollment numbers while others are partnering with businesses to beef up workforce training. "You have to be thinking beyond the current business model, whoever you are," said Stephen Spinelli Jr., president of Babson College.