K-12
Top stories summarized by our editors
12/18/2018

Early readers at various levels may get a boost from "systematic variation," a strategy where students use their skills in different ways and situations, assert Carolyn Brown and Jerry Zimmerman, co-founders of Foundations in Learning. In this commentary, they share seven points for teachers to consider when developing such an approach, including conducting baseline assessments and teaching foundational skills, such as phonics, to improve fluency.

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The Hechinger Report
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Carolyn Brown
12/18/2018

Teachers can rethink the study of "Romeo and Juliet," which typically includes reading aloud from the text, and opt to abridge the play, suggests Nicholas Provenzano, a high-school English teacher. In this blog post, he shares how he reimagined lessons by integrating humor and asking students to abridge the original work by writing their own shortened version of the Shakespeare classic.

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Edutopia online
12/18/2018

Guymon, Okla., is a community of less than 12,000 residents, with 37 languages spoken by immigrants and refugee families. This article highlights how the community, the schools and residents manage the challenges of linguistic diversity, including how to alert families about unfamiliar weather such as blizzards and tornadoes.

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Okla. town, Guymon
12/18/2018

K-12 schools can use $1.17 billion in federal Student Support and Academic Enrichment Grants -- part of the Every Student Succeeds Act -- to promote safe schools, effective technology use and a well-rounded education, according to a guide from the International Society for Technology in Education. The organization also recommends schools use the funds to pay for classes that focus on digital citizenship, as well as tools and software that support digital literacy.

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EdScoop
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ISTE
12/18/2018

Sen. Lamar Alexander, chairman of the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, announced Monday that he will not seek re-election in 2020. Alexander, a former governor and education secretary, was one of the key designers of the Every Student Succeeds Act, as well as the reauthorization of a federal career and technical education law, and he helped to craft bills on math and science education plus early learning.

12/18/2018

At-risk students who enrolled in high-school remediation courses improved their incomes and education later in life, according to a working paper produced by an international team of researchers. The findings come from a study of students in Israel.

12/18/2018

The elementary grades can set students up with a powerful foundation in science, technology, engineering and math, teacher Anne Jolly writes. In this blog post, she offers five tips to make elementary STEM lessons engaging, including focusing on inquiry-based learning and centering activities around an engineering design process.

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MiddleWeb
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Anne Jolly
12/18/2018

Puerto Rico Secretary of Education Julia Keleher is focused on helping the US territory's school system recover after two devastating hurricanes in 2017, which struck just after she took office. In this interview, she offers an update on the recovery and talks about the reforms she has implemented, including a focus on the whole child.

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Education Dive
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Julia Keleher
12/18/2018

Shawn Duff, a California high-school geography teacher, uses a mobile app to help students learn academic subjects through songs. In this commentary, Duff describes using the Studytracks app, which has a catalog of more than 1,300 songs, to help students better retain information.

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eSchool News
12/18/2018

The number of confirmed child physical-abuse reports on the Saturdays after a Friday report card distribution were nearly four times higher than on regular Saturdays, according to a study published in JAMA Pediatrics based on 2015-16 data involving 1,943 confirmed child-abuse hotline calls among Florida youths ages 5 to 11. Researchers found, however, that releasing report cards on other days of the week didn't seem to affect child-abuse incidence rates.

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JAMA Pediatrics, Florida