K-12
Top stories summarized by our editors
6/17/2019

LaQuandra Nesbitt, director of the Washington, D.C., Department of Health, wrote to the city's principals urging them to encourage parents to get their children vaccinated for measles amid a spike in reported cases of the illness. D.C.'s vaccination rate for diseases among kindergartners -- 81.3% -- is the lowest in a nationwide comparison.

6/17/2019

Changes to Medicaid in North Carolina have caused agencies to question whether mental health services provided by schools will continue to be covered. The changes mean that most patients will be transferred to standard plans and that school-based services would have to be deemed essential under the law.

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North Carolina
6/17/2019

Nearly 300 students from eight schools in a Massachusetts district recently took part in a peer-training program from the Anti-Defamation League that addresses discrimination, bullying and prejudice. Older students in the program, which will be continued for the next two years with United Way funding, then talk with younger students about issues and struggles.

6/17/2019

Kansas is on track to provide enough funding for educating students in the state by 2022, according to a state Supreme Court ruling handed down Friday. The ruling, however, does not close the case due to "inexact" predictions for inflation and a lack of a commitment to future funding contributions by the state.

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Supreme Court, Kansas
6/14/2019

Three educators in this commentary share best practices and tech tools that they use to boost student engagement. One of them, Georgia kindergarten teacher Victoria Mendoza, says she uses tech to offer video warm-ups and brain breaks with dancing and singing to engage her young students.

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Victoria Mendoza, Georgia
6/14/2019

Boston is beginning a process to eliminate middle schools altogether after the city's school committee took a unanimous vote to do so Wednesday night. The policy aims to minimize the disruptions students experience when they change schools, and under the system they would go directly from elementary to secondary school at grade seven or nine.

6/14/2019

Minnesota Education Commissioner Mary Cathryn Ricker brings to the role the experience as a leader in teacher unions and a National Board Certified Teacher. In this interview, Ricker shares about her vision for her state, how important the certification process has been to her and that she has wanted certification "to be open to everyone."

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MinnPost
6/14/2019

Students at a Rhode Island middle school are participating in a Generation Citizen program to engage young people in civics by challenging them to develop action plans to address community issues. Students pitched their ideas -- on topics including bullying, drug and alcohol abuse and violence in schools -- to state lawmakers earlier this year as part of a statewide civics event.

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Rhode Island middle school
6/14/2019

Educators are increasingly advocating for classrooms and libraries to include a more diverse selection of books that reflect students' own experiences. Laura Jimenez, a lecturer in Boston University's education school, however says that simply having the books on the shelf will not curb stereotypes.

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Boston University
6/14/2019

Students' culture and identity should be factored into data analysis, writes leadership coach Andrew Knips. In this blog post, he shares six strategies to help support more equitable data analysis, including taking steps to address implicit bias.

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Edutopia online
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Andrew Knips