K-12
Top stories summarized by our editors
6/14/2019

State budgets nationwide could include about $14 billion more for schools in fiscal year 2020, according to a survey by the National Association of State Budget Officers. This blog post identifies five key ways school districts may spend the additional funds, including on infrastructure and to recover from past budget cuts.

6/14/2019

There appears to be a shifting power dynamic between the US Department of Education and states over their plans to implement the Every Student Succeeds Act, according to researchers Megan Duff and Priscilla Wohlstetter of Teachers College, Columbia University. Of note, they explain, is the department's blanket approval of ESSA plans.

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Education Dive
6/14/2019

Some student education-technology entrepreneurs are using their own experiences to help them design classroom tech that can help support learning. One group of high-schoolers in Texas is designing a mobile app that will provide students with real-time feedback to help them prepare for class presentations.

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The Hechinger Report
6/14/2019

Legislation removing religious exemptions and effectively eliminating all nonmedical exemptions for school-mandated vaccinations in New York has been signed into law by Gov. Andrew Cuomo, amid the ongoing measles outbreak. "The science is crystal clear: Vaccines are safe, effective and the best way to keep our children safe," Cuomo said in a statement.

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Gov. Andrew Cuomo
6/14/2019

Approximately half of the 41 countries on which UNICEF analyzed data provide the recommended six months or more of paid maternity leave, and many wealthy nations provide less support for families than countries with smaller GDPs, according to a United Nations report. Family-friendly policies "depend a lot on, not just the political priorities of a particular day or a particular government administration, but they really sometimes build on how society views children and women," says Yekaterina Chzhen, lead author of the report.

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UNICEF, United Nations
6/14/2019

A dugout canoe discovered last fall buried on a Maine beach has been recovered by conservationists and archaeologists who will study its history, work to restore it and use it as a history teaching tool in local programs for children. Carbon tests show the canoe, made from the trunk of a birch tree, dates to 1280 to 1380 A.D.

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Maine
6/14/2019

Students in a Texas summer school program are working with soda ash to learn pottery techniques used by Native American and Egyptian cultures. The program -- a partnership of a school district and the University of Texas Permian Basin -- blends art, science and social studies as students use the clay to make their own pottery and other artwork.

6/13/2019

Equal treatment -- when everyone receives the same service -- differs from equitable treatment, writes Paul Reville of the Harvard Graduate School of Education. In this commentary, Reville outlines what education can learn from health care and shares several examples of how some schools are working to identify students' needs and strive for equity.

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The Hechinger Report
6/13/2019

Bringing artificial intelligence into the classroom can benefit teachers and students by challenging the way they look at the world, some experts say. Some teachers' students have designed and debugged chatbots for other teachers, while other students have pursued projects of personal interest, such as a chatbot that helps users determine whether they should consider therapy with a counselor.

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T.H.E. Journal
6/13/2019

Education leaders must act to curb teacher attrition, several advocates and experts said during a recent National Center on Education and the Economy event. Peggy Brookins, president and CEO of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, suggested that National Board certification "can be a lever to elevate teaching."

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Education Dive