STEM Careers
Top stories summarized by our editors
10/16/2018

High-schoolers in a California district are enrolled in career pathway programs, so they can prepare for careers in health care, technology and culinary arts, among others. Steve Boyle, Escondido Union High School District superintendent, says the goal is to help students see the connection between what they learn in school and their future careers.

More Summaries:
Steve Boyle
10/16/2018

A South Dakota school district is preparing middle-schoolers for future workforce needs by introducing two enrichment classes: Spanish and science, technology, engineering and math. Students tackle coding, robotics and technology in the STEM class, and the Spanish class is intended to expose students to language to prepare them for high-school study.

10/16/2018

A Viking ship buried deep beneath an ancient, unexcavated cemetery in Norway has been revealed by radar scanning, according to the Norwegian Institute for Cultural Heritage Research. Archaeologists also found evidence of five longhouses in the area, which is near a burial mound approximately 1,500 years old.

Full Story:
LiveScience
10/16/2018

Ninety students at an Illinois high school are enrolled in the school's agriculture program and are active in the FFA. In this Q&A, the school's agriculture teacher, Scott Riden, shares how he has grown the program and notes that several of his past students are studying agriculture in college.

10/16/2018

Montana hospitals and rural clinics find it challenging to recruit clinicians, partly because there are not enough students or training sites to prepare the next generation of providers. Martha Robertson of the Western Montana Area Health Education Center said there are too few millennials entering the system to fill vacancies left by retiring providers, leaving a shortage of nurses and other clinicians.

10/16/2018

The Higgs boson's existence suggests that the universe will keep expanding, according to a paper published in Physical Review D. The findings raise questions about a conjecture made earlier this year that dark energy gradually changes and could lead to the universe's eventual collapse.

Full Story:
LiveScience
10/16/2018

An 85-million-year-old fossil has been identified as belonging to a newborn Tylosaurus that had yet to develop the creature's distinctive long snout, according to findings published in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. Takuya Konishi of the University of Cincinnati examined the fossil more than 25 years after it was found in a Kansas rock formation and determined where the marine reptile fit in the Mosasaur family tree.

Full Story:
BBC
More Summaries:
University of Cincinnati
10/16/2018

Scientists have developed a method of identifying lipid accumulation in the livers of rodents using a single-walled carbon nanotube. Lead researcher Daniel Heller says the nanotube's fluorescence changes wavelengths when it comes in contact with lipid buildup, which could allow for the noninvasive diagnosis of conditions such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, atherosclerosis and Niemann-Pick disease.

10/16/2018

The milk protein lactoferrin may help lessen the negative side effects of chemotherapy, including loss of appetite, a Virginia Tech study found. "Our research shows that daily lactoferrin supplementation elicits changes in the salivary protein profiles in cancer patients -- changes that may be influential in helping to protect taste buds and odor perception," said study co-author Susan Duncan.

Full Story:
AgWeb
More Summaries:
nausea, cancer
10/16/2018

Two nanobioscience researchers at the State University of New York Polytechnic Institute have been awarded grants totaling $1.58 million. Janet Paluh received over $970,000 from the New York State Department of Health for a study of spinal cord injury treatments, plus another $162,000 for traumatic brain injury research, while Michael Fasullo was awarded $446,000 from the NIH for his study of colon cancer, diet and genetics.