STEM Careers
Top stories summarized by our editors
10/15/2018

Students at a West Virginia high school are learning job skills in an on-campus coffee shop that is part of the school's career and technical education program. Students who work in the shop get experience in job skills, such as clocking in and out, and providing customer service.

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West Virginia high school
10/15/2018

NASA scientists are working to get the Hubble Space Telescope back online after a gyroscope malfunctioned and the spacecraft went into safe mode on Oct. 5. NASA says it'll make Hubble work with one gyroscope, with the other functioning gyroscope as a backup, if scientists can't restore three-gyroscope capabilities.

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Space
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NASA, Hubble, Hubble
10/15/2018

Students at a Pennsylvania school are enrolled in a new pre-apprenticeship carpentry program that is a partnership with a local construction company. Mike Klinepeter, executive vice president of Pyramid Construction Services, says the program is aimed at introducing students to potential careers in the skilled trades.

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Pennsylvania school
10/15/2018

High-schoolers in an Iowa district are working with preschool students as part of an early-childhood education program. The students are working toward earning a childhood development associate credential.

10/15/2018

Two female FFA members at an Indiana high school are finalists in a nationwide tractor restoration competition. The competition included rebuilding and restoring a 1950 John Deere tractor.

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John Deere, Indiana high school, FFA
10/15/2018

The eruption of Mount Vesuvius in A.D. 79 may have spewed ash hot enough to boil some victims' bodily fluids, making their skulls explode, according to findings published in PLOS ONE, but one expert says temperatures wouldn't have been hot enough to cause such damage. Researchers looked at residue on the victims' bones that they say may have been caused by "massive heat-induced hemorrhage," according to the study.

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LiveScience
10/15/2018

The remains of a 10-year-old child who lived 1,550 years ago have been found in a cemetery in Lugnano, Italy, with a rock shoved into the child's mouth. Archaeologists suspect the child may have died of malaria and said the stone was placed in the belief that doing so would keep the child from coming back to life and therefore ward off the disease's spread.

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LiveScience
10/15/2018

Levels of gamma aminobutyric acid receptors in people with autism are the same as those in people without the disorder, according to findings published in Science Translational Medicine. However, the study suggests there could be a problem with GABA signaling in those on the autism spectrum.

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The Scientist online
10/15/2018

A $1.5 million project funded by the US Fish and Wildlife Service along with matching funds will enable the Rhode Island Natural History Survey and The Conservation Agency to study coyotes for five years. The study involves genetic analysis and will look at how the coyote population is changing and how coyotes are affected when humans provide food sources.

10/15/2018

The NIH has awarded $12.3 million to the University of Vermont's Larner College of Medicine to establish a center to study infectious diseases. The Translational Global Infectious Disease Research Center will draw on many disciplines to find ways to prevent and manage such diseases.

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NIH, University of Vermont