STEM Careers
Top stories summarized by our editors
11/19/2018

At one Mississippi high school, 85 students are taking part in the Future Educators of America club with some of the students shadowing teachers to decide whether they want to become educators. Each year, one graduating senior is awarded a college scholarship named for the former teacher who began the program in 1993.

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Mississippi high school
11/19/2018

The nonprofit Bread + Butter is pairing high-school students in South Carolina with professional chefs. The program is aimed at providing at-risk students with career training and helping to shore up the local workforce.

11/19/2018

Some manufacturers in Ohio say they are struggling to find enough skilled workers for open positions. Vector Technical President Tim Bleich and Fredon Corp. owner Roger Sustar say the shortage is increasing salaries in the industry.

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WEWS-TV (Cleveland)
11/19/2018

A recent report from 451 Research and Polyverse cited infrastructure-focused IT jobs as the most affected by a general skills shortage in the IT field. To combat the skills shortage, companies should frequently try to improve processes and operational developments, understand where risk management fits, try to eliminate classes of issues by improving technology and consider embedded security rather than bolted-on security.

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TechRepublic
11/19/2018

NASA scientists have built in several ways for the Mars InSight lander to communicate about a landing when it reaches the red planet Nov. 26. The lander is equipped with beacons that will send signals as it goes through the landing process and after it lands, and InSight's accompanying Mars Cube One cubesats will monitor the landing, as will the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and the 2001 Mars Odyssey.

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Space
11/19/2018

A collection of dots carved into stone in an approximately 4,000-year-old rock-shelter in Azerbaijan is an example of a game called 58 holes, or Hounds and Jackals, previously believed to only have been played in the Near East during the Bronze Age, according to findings presented at the American Schools of Oriental Research annual meeting. "Bronze Age herders in that region must have had contacts with the Near Eastern world," said Walter Crist, the archaeologist who made the discovery.

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Science News
11/19/2018

Scientists were surprised to find that the kidney organoids, or mini kidneys, they were growing from stem cells in the lab also contained brain and muscle cells, a study published online by Cell Stem Cell suggests. "We call these 'off-target' cells," said Benjamin Humphreys, co-author of the study.

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LiveScience
11/19/2018

Grain-free diets based on uncommon protein sources have been linked to a rising rate of cardiomyopathy in dogs not genetically predisposed to the heart condition. Researchers have not pinpointed a specific ingredient or nutrient deficiency behind the link, but they have noticed a connection to smaller companies' "boutique" foods and homemade diets, says veterinary cardiologist Ryan Fries, so owners should turn to established, trusted companies that rely on scientific research. "Make sure to bring up your pet's diet with your veterinarian, who can help you find a safe and nutritionally appropriate food," Dr. Fries says.

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Ryan Fries, cardiomyopathy
11/19/2018

New Zealand has added over $287 million to its National Science Challenges program, which has sparked more than 150 projects over 11 challenge areas since its inception in 2014. "Now that we're satisfied with those challenges, we can go and release the next phase of funding," said Megan Woods, New Zealand minister of research, science and innovation.

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Radio New Zealand
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New Zealand
11/19/2018

The National Agricultural Genotyping Center at North Dakota State University is structuring its efforts around the six areas it considers easiest to fund, including plant pathogen detection and honeybee-disease testing, as resources in the agriculture industry become scarcer. "There's nobody else that has an open platform like we do that looks at so many different types of research," said center President and CEO Pete Snyder.

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Agweek