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10/16/2018

A class of West Virginia first-grade students have completed 100,000 math problems since school began in August. The class, which now will aim for 500,000 completed problems, got a grant to access an online program that they use to hold math competitions.

10/16/2018

Teenagers who use their cellphones to make phone calls more often score slightly lower than their peers on a memory test, according to a study of 700 teens by researchers at the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute in Basel, Switzerland. Researchers posit that radiation may be responsible for the difference.

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Science News
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Public Health Institute
10/16/2018

A group of New Jersey middle-school students wanted to build an invention that would help prevent concussions after a friend was affected by one. In this blog post, teacher Jonathan Harvey shares how his students won the Samsung Solve For Tomorrow contest with their football helmet sensor that helps to detect sudden movements in the head and signs of a concussion.

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SmartBrief/Education
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Jonathan Harvey, Samsung, New Jersey
10/16/2018

The number of students in New York City's public schools living in temporary housing reached a record 114,659 this past school year, according to the Advocates for Children of New York. This marked the third year in a row that the number exceeded 100,000, the group said.

10/16/2018

"Fidelity testing" can ensure that school safety measures function in real-world situations, asserts Michael Dorn, executive director of the nonprofit Safe Havens International. In this commentary, he offers some examples of how schools can test the fidelity of their safety protocols.

10/16/2018

More school districts in Illinois have installed high-speed internet, with about 96% of districts offering internet speeds of 110 kbps per student, according to data from EducationSuperHighway. About 78 districts in the state are still without fiber-optic connections.

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National Public Radio
10/16/2018

As more donors use Bitcoin to donate to colleges and universities, leaders are seeking to understand the cryptocurrency and shape policies around the acceptance of such gifts. Some universities, including Cornell and the University of California at Berkeley, recently have accepted Bitcoin donations.

10/16/2018

A survey shows that nearly half of all college students say they will vote in the Nov. 6 midterm elections, with 57% of Democratic students pledging to vote, compared with 40.5% of Republican students. Nancy Thomas, director of the Institute for Democracy & Higher Education at Tufts University, says some barriers to student voting remain, including identification laws and other requirements.

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Tufts University
10/16/2018

Attorneys for Students for Fair Admissions told a US District Court judge this week that Harvard University engages in "intentional discrimination" against Asian-American students, while attorneys for the school argued that race is never viewed as a negative in admissions. No matter the outcome, some legal experts say the case may be brought before the US Supreme Court.

10/16/2018

Students with parents who have more income and general wealth are more likely to enroll in college and graduate than students with less-wealthy parents, according to a study. Wealthier parents also were more likely than other parents to take out home-equity loans to help pay for a college education, the data showed.

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Inside Higher Ed