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3/27/2020

The Canadian province of Ontario has reached a tentative agreement with the association representing teachers in government-funded Catholic schools that contains about $23 million more for special education. The money will allow roughly 320 more teachers to be hired.

3/27/2020

Michael Palladino, who will be Bloomfield College's vice president for academic affairs and dean of the faculty in May, says that while he experienced some hesitation about accepting a leadership position early in his career, he is ultimately glad he did so. As much as he loves teaching, he writes that he feels he has a greater impact in his current role, and he urges other faculty members to at least consider any leadership roles they are offered.

3/27/2020

An informal survey by college affordability advocacy group Rise found 75% of 521 students polled said they have more anxiety, depression and stress because of the coronavirus outbreak. About half had work hours reduced or were laid off, 20% reported lack of access to healthy meals and a mobile device or Wi-Fi, and 17% said they didn't have safe and reliable housing.

3/27/2020

Teachers in New Bedford, Mass., are finding creative ways to teach remotely, including offering virtual field trips and using video to teach science experiments. Instruction is focused on enrichment materials, which lets students practice what they already know so they don't regress.

3/27/2020

Teachers from a San Antonio school district organized parades in cars through neighborhoods to greet students and shout encouragement while keeping their distance. The parades will be expanded to other neighborhoods as the coronavirus outbreak continues.

3/27/2020

As the US braces for an anticipated steep economic downtown stemming from the coronavirus pandemic, there are five trends K-12 officials should look for, says Marguerite Roza, a school finance professor at Georgetown University. Among them are inequitable spending among school districts and an increase in need among students.

3/27/2020

About 16 school districts in the US have ended or adjusted food services because of health concerns amid the coronavirus pandemic. A West Virginia district, for example, is planning to restart its meal distribution, replacing daily meals with a weekly service that will provide multiple meals to students.

3/27/2020

Joe Phillips, K-12 technology director at Kansas City Public Schools in Missouri, says positioning yourself as an educational leader, rather than a technology leader, helps in gaining the support of stakeholders and administrators. In this Q&A, he describes how he streamlined and updated technology to support the district's mission and goals.

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EdTech online
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technology director
3/27/2020

Education leaders say they will need far more than the
$13.5 billion in relief aid for K-12 schools that is provided in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act, passed this week by the US Senate. Due to the full shift in district operations, the need is even greater than in 2009 when schools received about $77 billion in relief from the Obama administration, says Chip Slaven, chief advocacy officer for the National School Boards Association.

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Education Dive
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US Senate
3/27/2020

The University of Minnesota Twin Cities has seen its six-year graduation rate grow from 27% to 69% for Alaska Native and American Indian students. The gains may be partly because the school has become more selective and put many academic and social supports in place, including access to Native mentors and on-campus events that include Native students from throughout the US.

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The Hechinger Report
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University of Minnesota