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Top stories summarized by our editors
9/28/2021

A StoryWalk can turn solitary reading into a dynamic activity by engaging students' minds and bodies, according to Emily Crawford, a teacher librarian in Washington state. In this article, Crawford offers tips for creating a StoryWalk, including selecting the right book, with picture books being ideal for the project.

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Edutopia
9/28/2021

Seventh-grade science students in Maine helped marine researchers study the behaviors of baby lobsters as part of a new education outreach program. Students participated in the identification of animals caught in lobster traps to see if baby lobsters are settling at lower depths than previously presumed.

9/28/2021

Adding social justice concepts to math lessons is one way to increase awareness surrounding equity and opportunity, history professor Steven Mintz writes. Mintz notes that many K-12 teachers are keeping real-life lessons math-focused by connecting the relationship of campaign spending to votes received; algebraic functions, statistics and math modeling to environmental issues; and finance lessons to income inequality.

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Inside Higher Ed
9/28/2021

Not-for-profit private schools, child care centers and a marine-science program are just a few of the initiatives underway for K-12 students in Palm Beach County, Fla. The programs are designed specifically to improve opportunity for underserved students, often with private benefactors providing scholarships to ease tuition costs.

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Seth Cohen
9/28/2021

Teachers have more influence than parents when it comes to motivating students to learn, according to an analysis of 144 studies involving nearly 80,000 students by researchers from Canada and Australia. Researchers also conclude that competency, belonging and autonomy are keys to motivation.

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The Hechinger Report
9/28/2021

Some college classes -- especially those held in lecture halls -- may stay virtual long after the pandemic, and students are praising the value of that while pointing out that smaller, in-person classes and campus activities still provide the physical connections they seek. Some education leaders in this interview, however, say they won't rush into permanent virtual classes until they can ensure a quality education that leads to graduation.

9/28/2021

Affordability, size and outreach are some of the reasons more adults age 25 and older are flocking to historically Black colleges and universities in North Carolina, officials say. Nearly half of Fayetteville State University's students are in this demographic, and the school has been making a concerted effort to support adult students' particular needs.

9/28/2021

Universities can and should invest money in creating their own online classes rather than cease virtual instruction or hand over the remote-class reins to private companies, Faith Kirk of San Jose State University writes. While remote learning provides flexibility that attracts more students, Kirk points to research showing that many campuses fulfill key needs that online learning can not, including access to Wi-Fi, safe buildings and food pantries.

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EdSource
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San Jose State University
9/28/2021

Seventeen students are part of a new immersion English for Speakers of Other Languages programme at Nelson College, a secondary school in New Zealand. The immersion course is aimed at helping the students learn grammar and vocabulary, as well as navigate a new way of learning.

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Stuff (New Zealand)
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Nelson College
9/28/2021

Sujata Wycoff, director of communications for Waterbury Public Schools, notes that she works to strike a balance when communicating with parents and guardians -- ensuring communication is informative but does not overwhelm them. In this blog post, Wycoff shares five tips to communicate with parents and guardians, including spacing out and consolidating messages to avoid excessive notifications.

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SmartBrief/Education