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3/19/2019

Many colleges and universities are working to support students experiencing hunger and homelessness with efforts such as creating housing programs or on-campus food pantries. "[I]f we really are focused on increasing access and providing these [educational] opportunities for students, we have an obligation to help support their success and that means creating these support structures around affordable housing and food insecurity," said Ed Mirecki, the University of Washington-Tacoma's dean of students.

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The Hechinger Report
3/19/2019

The FBI investigation, "Operation Varsity Blues," involving alleged fraud in college admissions -- including possible cheating on standardized tests -- is reviving questions about whether SAT and ACT tests should be required for college applicants. The College Board is defending the objectivity of their exams, but many critics say the tests are inherently discriminatory and susceptible to cheating techniques.

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College Board, FBI
3/19/2019

Delaware would increase the ranks of counselors, psychologists and mental health professionals in elementary schools and create health centers in "high needs" high schools under bills proposed by two legislators. Supporters cite national data showing the high incidence of mental illness among the young and point to its links to school failure, crime and death by suicide.

3/19/2019

More recruiters are experiencing "ghosting," in which people do not show up for a job or a job interview. People might develop a bad reputation in an industry by doing this, and that will not bode well for them if the job market takes a downturn, communication specialist John Feldmann writes.

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Forbes
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Ghosting, John Feldmann
3/19/2019

DNA from a broken pipe used for smoking tobacco 200 years ago has linked a woman who was a slave at a Maryland plantation to a people group in a region of West Africa, according to findings published in the Journal of Archaeological Science. Archaeologists say similar research may help connect more people to their communities of origin.

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The Scientist online
3/19/2019

Humans may be able to sense Earth's magnetic field like birds, insects and fish do, a study published in eNeuro suggests. Researchers detected changes in study participants' brain activity when the directions of magnetic fields created with electromagnetic coils located near them were changed.

3/19/2019

Viruses that affect plants -- and sometimes insects -- infect separate cells with different segments of their genetic material, according to findings published in eLife. Researchers examined the faba bean necrotic stunt virus, using different-colored dyes on various segments of its DNA to see how it infected faba bean plant cells.

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The Scientist online
3/19/2019

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency has partnered with Toyota to build a large staffed lunar rover that could be ready to traverse the moon as soon as 2029. The vehicle would seat up to four people, have a maximum range of about 10,000 kilometers and be powered by fuel cells.

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Space
3/19/2019

National Science Foundation funding for geosciences, mathematics and physical sciences, as well as research in the Arctic and Antarctica, would be cut under President Donald Trump's fiscal 2020 budget proposal. Trump's budget proposes cuts for the NIH and the Environmental Protection Agency in addition to the 12% cut recommended for the NSF.

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Nature (free content)
3/19/2019

The Florence High School Career and Technical program in Alabama will offer students an opportunity to earn industry credentials as part of its dual-enrollment program. About 30 students are enrolled in the program to earn a Manufacturing Skills Standards Council certification.