Foodservice
Top stories summarized by our editors
11/13/2018

It is normal to make social comparisons, especially involving social media, but being driven to regularly make comparisons can cause negative feelings that may lead to behaviors such as disordered eating, writes registered dietitian Alissa Rumsey. Developing self-compassion and using mindfulness are ways to counter negative comparisons, Rumsey writes, along with discontinuing social media accounts that trigger negative emotions or comparisons.

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Alissa Rumsey
11/13/2018

Real Good Foods CEO Bryan Freeman says the company got its frozen foods onto retail shelves by first developing a community through direct-to-consumer fulfillment and social media marketing. This cultivated a base of fans who cared about the brand before it expanded into 12,000 stores.

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Entrepreneur online
11/13/2018

Imperfect, which sells produce that is less-than-perfect cosmetically, is expanding on the East Coast by opening a distribution center in Baltimore. A recent investment from Thirty Five Ventures will help Imperfect further develop its mission to reduce food waste.

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Waste360
11/13/2018

Marriott International's Culture Day program has expanded rapidly since its introduction four years ago, with demand doubling this year. "As international travel grows worldwide and Marriott continues to expand into more countries and territories, embracing differences is more critical than ever to ensure a warm welcome for all," said Apoorva Gandhi, Marriott International's vice president of multicultural affairs.

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Travel Daily Media
11/13/2018

In the wake of recent complaints regarding racial bias and a lack of inclusiveness within the company, Adidas has released a statement that says it is committed to inclusiveness in the workplace. The statement is in response to a letter sent to the company's North American president, Zion Armstrong, by an employee describing racial bias and preferential treatment based on personal relationships within the firm.

11/13/2018

A majority of women in the workplace feel that exclusion is a form of bullying, whereas a majority of men believe it is not, according to a recent study released by EY. Additionally, the study found that 40% of workers feel physically alone or ignored in the workplace, and many employees preferred employers checking in with them rather than some form of public recognition or invitation to events.

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Forbes
11/13/2018

Leadership plays a critical role in developing an inclusive, diverse workplace, but leaders often struggle to accomplish these goals, writes Jim Barnett. Leaders must begin by identifying and understanding bias, then build a culture of open conversation before adjusting the plan and recycling it to ensure the workplace continues to grow more inclusive, Barnett notes.

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Forbes
11/13/2018

Interest in Spanish cuisine has spurred romesco, a sauce made with red pepper, nuts and garlic, to appear on more US menus, according to Datassential. Mentions of the sauce, which typically accompanies seafood, have grown 90% on US menus over the last four years.

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Datassential
11/13/2018

Ecologists Rob Dunn and Anne Madden found in a recent experiment that the bacterial species found on bakers' hands were closely linked to those found in the starters they made and the bread they baked. "Not only do we impact the species in our food, but the species in our food impacts the species on or in our bodies," Dunn said.

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National Public Radio
11/13/2018

Chefs around the world are giving new life to millets, a category of gluten-free grains that require less water to grow than rice. In India, chef Sri Ram runs an all-millet restaurant called Ahaar Kuteer, and Pierre Thiam Catering in New York promotes a millet variety called fonio that has a long history in Senegalese cuisine.

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Food Tank
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Pierre Thiam