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3/3/2021

Telehealth that connects hospital workers to off-site stroke specialists has improved stroke patient outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic, and the findings, published in JAMA Neurology, highlight the need to overcome barriers to video-enhanced care at rural hospitals, says co-author Andrew Wilcock. The reperfusion treatment rate was 13% higher at hospitals with stroke telecare, and stroke patients treated at those hospitals were 4% more likely to survive the next 30 days.

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HealthDay News
3/3/2021

Asian, Black, Hispanic and Native American caregivers of people with Alzheimer's disease are significantly more likely than white caregivers to experience discrimination, language issues and a lack of cultural competence while navigating the health care system, according to an Alzheimer's Association report. In some cases, health care professionals "don't even listen to what they are saying," which negatively affects care, and some institutions are working to improve cultural competence, says Alzheimer's Association Chief Science Officer Maria Carrillo.

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National Public Radio
3/3/2021

Chronic joint pain was reduced by an average of 41% and physical function increased by 48% in people with knee osteoarthritis using a physiotherapy app, compared with 6% and 13%, respectively, in patients receiving conventional care, researchers reported in JAMA Network Open. The app connected patients with licensed physiotherapists who provided education and exercises, while patients in the control group followed self-management guidelines and visited a primary care provider as needed.

3/3/2021

An analysis of tweets about COVID-19 found that scientific and nonscientific events influence health belief trends equally, and existing biases are reinforced by other users, researchers reported in the Journal of Medical Internet Research. The researchers used natural language processing and machine learning techniques to analyze tweets and determine how events such as scientific studies, political speeches and mandates influenced perceptions of COVID-19 susceptibility, severity, benefits and barriers.

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Health IT Analytics
3/3/2021

The COVID-19 pandemic and the restrictions on social engagement it brought about at assisted living and retirement facilities may be sparking more relationships and romance among residents. Daniel Reingold, CEO at the Hebrew Home at Riverdale in the Bronx, N.Y., said there is more relationship-building and that it's due to an increased appreciation of love rather than a fear of mortality.

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The New York Times
3/3/2021

Data show COVID-19 vaccination rates are lower for older Black and Latino people, compared with whites, and experts say barriers to health care, including a lack of transportation, may be making it more difficult for them to get a shot. Older residents in Gilroy, Calif., which is almost 60% Latino, have had trouble making appointments for a vaccination because they don't have internet access or are not comfortable with technology, according Jorge Mendoza, president of the community outreach group Nueva Vida.

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Nueva Vida
3/3/2021

A National Poll on Aging survey of more than 2,000 adults ages 50 to 80 found 80% said their primary care physician had not asked about their hearing in the past two years. The survey found 16% of older adults described their hearing ability as fair or poor and that number increased to 28% among those who had fair or poor physical health overall.

3/3/2021

New mobility services popular with younger people, such as shared scooters, bike sharing and e-taxis, were not designed with older adults in mind and have failed to attract this demographic, experts said. Nico Larco, director of the Urbanism Next Center, said while companies struggle to serve older adults with mobility issues and cognitive disabilities overall, the problem is even worse in rural areas where many retirement-age adults don't want to give out their credit card information online.

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Streetsblog
3/2/2021

Z23, encounter for immunization, is the only ICD-10 code in use for COVID-19 vaccinations, and CPT codes 91300 and 91301 differentiate between Pfizer and Moderna vaccines, respectively, with specific suffixes indicating first and second doses. Coding adverse effects and events associated with vaccination is more nuanced and based on differences between side effects, adverse effects and adverse events, writes emergency physician Erica Remer.

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ICD10Monitor
3/2/2021

Twitter users face permanent bans for repeatedly disseminating misinformation about COVID-19 vaccines, treatments, preventive measures and regulations. Tweets that contain potentially misleading information about COVID-19 vaccines will get a label with a link to a reliable source, and tweets containing misinformation deemed the most harmful will be removed, says Katy Minshall, Twitter's head of public policy in the UK.

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The Verge, Reuters
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Twitter