Health IT News
Top stories summarized by our editors
2/20/2020

Electronic medical devices contain an array of software and hardware components made by different companies with different licensing restrictions that complicate the process of patching security vulnerabilities, writes Mitch Parker, chief information security officer at Indiana University Health. Many connected medical devices are made by small companies and rely on multiple free or open-source software utilities maintained by even smaller third parties, and "addressing the risks means understanding and addressing the value chain for how a device evolves from concept to disposition," Parker writes.

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Ars Technica
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Mitch Parker
2/20/2020

The Mayo Clinic is using Lumeon's automation platform to extend access to a clinical insights library to other health care organizations. Content includes symptoms, tests and procedures for chronic diseases in English, Spanish and Arabic, as well as behavioral health, maternity, risk assessment and wellness algorithms.

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Health Exec
2/20/2020

Health care providers in Georgia now have access to patients' lab data through the Georgia Health Information Network, which network executive operating officer Pam Matthews says will prevent unnecessary and duplicate testing and reduce costs.

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EHR Intelligence
2/20/2020

The Health Information Technology Advisory Committee released a list of 31 tasks related to health data interoperability, privacy and security, and patient access, and the advisory group suggested adding a workgroup this year to examine how parties not subject to HIPAA handle health data. The report will be sent to the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT for approval before the ONC sends it to Congress and the HHS secretary.

2/20/2020

A predictive algorithm reduced intraoperative hypotension duration and severity in patients undergoing elective, noncardiac surgery, according to a study published in JAMA and presented at the Society of Critical Care Medicine's annual meeting. The intervention involves connecting a catheter placed in the radial artery to a pressure transducer equipped with early-warning software, and hemodynamic parameters were updated on a display in 20-second intervals.

2/20/2020

Having prior authorization forms ready and assigning the task to specific staff members are two ways practices can make prior authorization easier. Document the need for the medication or procedure in the patient's chart and make the patient's information available to the staff member submitting the request.

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Medical Economics
2/20/2020

Feras Hatib, director of research and development for algorithms and signal processing at Edwards Lifesciences, will discuss at HIMSS20 a machine learning-based technology developed by his team that uses arterial pressure waveforms to predict future hypertension in acute-care patients. The technology offers real-word evidence that advance analytics can inform clinical practice, and Hatib said machine learning could also be used "in the ICU, in predicting sepsis, which is critical for patient survival."

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Healthcare IT News
2/20/2020

A survey of 100-plus health system professionals across the US found that 50% see deployment of digital health tools as a critical or high priority, and more than 75% said their organizations offer at least one digital health tool to patients, while 25% offer at least four. The poll, conducted by UPMC's Center for Connected Medicine, found that 40% said their organizations have added digital health tools into the overall patient experience.

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UPMC
2/20/2020

National Health IT Coordinator Don Rucker said the interoperability rule is "coming out relatively soon." Developing the rule has been complicated because of the need to "draw the right balance on protecting privacy, yet address what is ultimately the biggest issue, which is simply the vast amount of health care costs that are out there and the lack of patients having agency," he said.

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HealthLeaders Media
2/19/2020

A "nudge" in EHRs reduced the number of inappropriate tests for hospital-onset Clostridioides difficile infection at four hospitals, researchers reported in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology. An alert notified health care providers ordering a CDI test if the patient received a laxative or stool softener in the previous 24 hours, and the percentage of tests deemed inappropriate declined by a percentage point and monthly CDI orders fell 21% after the nudge was implemented.