Health IT News
Top stories summarized by our editors
9/13/2019

An EHR-integrated clinical decision support tool based on Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines reduced group A streptococcus testing by 52% in children younger than 3 at Children's National Medical Center in Washington, D.C. Children younger than 3 in the US are unlikely to be infected with group A streptococcus or to develop rheumatic fever, and overtesting leads to overdiagnosis and overtreatment, says Tania Ahluwalia, leader of the study published in Pediatrics.

9/13/2019

North Carolina's Department of Health and Human Services is using patient intake platform Phreesia to screen new patients for social determinants of health and identify patients with unmet needs. The platform sends real-time alerts and analyses to health care providers and coordinators to help connect patients with the services they need.

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Health IT Analytics
9/13/2019

A connected health platform developed at Eastern Maine Medical Center connects children and adolescents in rural areas whose body mass index is at or above the 85th percentile with health care providers and specialists through a tablet or similar device. The Medicaid-approved program involves an initial in-person visit followed by weekly video visits for about two months, then an ongoing care plan.

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mHealth Intelligence
9/13/2019

Legal experts say a recently finalized CMS rule expands regulators' authority to deny or revoke the Medicare enrollment of health care providers and suppliers for potentially fraudulent activity could have far-reaching effects beyond actual criminals. Providers and suppliers must disclose any ongoing or previous direct or indirect affiliation with entities that have uncollected debt, have been suspended from federal health programs, or have been excluded from or denied billing privileges under Medicare, Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program.

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JD Supra
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Medicare, Medicaid
9/13/2019

Genexe Health is among the genetic testing firms under federal investigation, and Medicare beneficiaries are being warned not to submit saliva samples or their Medicare information to anyone other than a trusted health care provider. Recruiters going door-to-door and attending events have lured seniors into giving up Medicare information in exchange for free genetic testing, and while seniors never receive the results, their Medicare accounts are billed, investigators say.

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CBS News
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Medicare
9/13/2019

New privacy guidelines from the Consumer Technology Association aim to establish a baseline for secure collection, use and sharing of data from personal health and wellness apps, devices and other digital tools. The guidelines were developed by industry stakeholders and "demonstrate that health tech companies understand they must be trusted stewards of patient data," said CTA CEO Gary Shapiro.

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Health IT Security
9/13/2019

A newly approved system from GE Healthcare uses artificial intelligence to scan X-ray images for signs of a collapsed lung, or pneumothorax, resulting in a diagnosis in as little as 15 minutes with 96% accuracy, GE says. The system flags suspected cases for immediate review by a radiologist and functions in the absence of an internet connection, according to GE.

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CNBC
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GE, GE Healthcare, FDA
9/13/2019

In a study published in The Lancet Digital Health, researchers reported on the development of an artificial intelligence algorithm that differentiates between Parkinson's disease and atypical parkinsonism on diffusion-weighted MRI scans. The algorithm could reduce the use of radioactive tracers, reduce misdiagnoses in clinical trials, and improve clinical care of patients with Parkinson's disease and parkinsonism, the researchers wrote.

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Parkinson's disease, Parkinsonism, AI
9/13/2019

Virtual reality, robotics, smart devices and remote patient monitoring could help people live longer and age in place, and the market for active aging technology is expected reach nearly $30 billion in the next three years, according to the Consumer Technology Association.

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CNBC
9/13/2019

A Massachusetts Health Policy Commission report says some community hospitals in markets like Boston appear to be using high-acuity billing codes to remain competitive as they lose market share to large health systems. Volume at the five largest health systems rose by 18 percentage points between 2010 and 2017 while declining by 16% at independent community hospitals, and the percentage of hospital discharges involving high-acuity billing codes rose from 56% to 62% statewide over the same period, the report says.