Health IT News
Top stories summarized by our editors
4/24/2019

Blockchain technology can help health care organizations monitor drug transactions and allow physicians to develop a decentralized patient data system and streamline information-sharing processes, says Sanjay Das, founder and managing director of SD Global. Blockchain can also reduce errors in clinical trials, enhance security of information and bolster interoperability between health care systems, he says.

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Blockchain
4/24/2019

A mutation in the SFTPC gene causes such severe lung dysfunction that most children with the mutation die shortly after birth, but a proof-of-concept study published in Science Translational Medicine suggests in utero genetic editing could correct the mutation. Scientists injected a CRISPR-edited gene into the amniotic fluid of mice and successfully inactivated the gene in 20% of them.

4/24/2019

A total of 120 substance abuse disorder providers will benefit from a $6 million grant awarded to New Jersey's Substance Use Disorder Promoting Interoperability Program by the state's Health and Human Services departments. The funding aims to bolster behavioral health providers' EHR access and enhance EHR interoperability between providers that are part of the New Jersey Health Information Network.

4/24/2019

Washington State University and its insurers will pay up to $5.26 million, as well as provide free credit monitoring to potential victims, to settle a class-action lawsuit that resulted from the theft of a safe at a storage facility in Olympia in April 2017. The safe contained a hard drive with information on almost 1.2 million individuals, including their names, personal health records and Social Security numbers, that had been collected by the university.

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Washington State University
4/24/2019

Surescripts' 2018 National Progress Report found that the number of health care organizations and professionals that have joined and participated in the Surescripts Network Alliance continues to increase, with health data exchange transactions rising from 13.7 billion in 2017 to 17.7 billion last year. "When we look at this vast exchange of actionable patient intelligence across care settings, we see interoperability in action -- and in evolution," the report authors wrote.

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EHR Intelligence
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Surescripts
4/24/2019

Many organizations -- and, specifically, health information management (HIM) professionals -- don't know how to prepare for or react to a cyberattack. Here's a quick primer.

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bok.ahima.org
4/24/2019

Join 4,500 health care leaders and professionals at the premier health data and information event for education and networking and foster lasting connections with professionals, leaders and changemakers from every corner of the health care ecosystem. The event starts Sept. 14 in Chicago. Register and secure your housing.

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mcisemi.com
4/24/2019

The federal Animal Welfare Act sets strict criteria for how animals used in research are housed, fed and transported, and the NIH, FDA and CDC have even stricter rules for federally funded research, writes FBR President Matthew R. Bailey. Efforts to block funding for crucial biomedical research won't protect animals, but if successful, they will impede progress toward treatments that improve the lives of people as well as their pets, Bailey writes.

4/24/2019

Scientists are using CRISPR gene editing to study evolution and complex biological processes in animals and to create animal models of human disease, supported in part by $24 million from the National Science Foundation. In the process, researchers are learning more about different species' behavior and life histories to overcome practical challenges, such as getting animals to reproduce in the lab.

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Nature (free content)
4/23/2019

Google has signaled it is entering the field of artificial intelligence in health care, and one analyst says the company has likely already invested billions of dollars. Greg Corrado, a Google research scientist, says AI and machine learning can be applied to numerous tasks, including "the kinds of tasks that doctors, nurses, clinicians and patients face every day."

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National Public Radio
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Google, AI