Health IT News
Top stories summarized by our editors
12/13/2018

A report from the Unit 42 threat research team of Palo Alto Networks showed that potential account compromises were found in 29% of cloud service providers it worked with and the networks of 32% of firms had at least one publicly exposed cloud storage system. The researchers found that companies weren't safeguarding their cloud systems through encryption and other best practices.

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The Hill
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Palo Alto Networks
12/13/2018

CHIME submitted a statement for the record to the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Health voicing some providers' concerns that the terms under the ONC's draft Trusted Exchange Framework and the Common Agreement may be difficult to put into practice within the timelines set. "The complexity and aggressive timeframes could discourage some organizations from participating in TEFCA, at least initially," said CHIME, which also inquired about consequences an organization could expect for nonparticipation.

12/12/2018

The Department of Transportation received more than 20,000 comments on airlines' refusal to transport lab animals -- a policy the National Association for Biomedical Research and other scientific advocacy organizations say undermines lifesaving research. The airlines say they have been targeted by animal rights organizations that threaten passenger safety and have disrupted service, but labs are "quite frankly running out of options," NABR President Matthew R. Bailey said.

12/12/2018

The Department of Transportation is considering public comments on a complaint filed against United Airlines, British Airways, China Southern Airlines and Qatar Airways in which the National Association for Biomedical Research says the airlines have illegally discriminated "against customers who seek to transport animals for purposes of live animal research undertaken at medical and other research facilities." If the DOT does not act, "[t]reatments and cures will be delayed, and ultimately society, as well as the animals we love, will pay the cost," said NABR President Matthew R. Bailey.

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OutsourcingPharma
12/12/2018

Pagosa Springs Medical Center in Colorado was fined $111,400 by the HHS Office for Civil Rights after it failed to terminate a former employee's access to its scheduling calendar, which contained 557 patients' electronic protected health information. The investigation found that the employee accessed the calendar twice and that there also was no business associate agreement between PSMC and scheduling calendar vendor Google.

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Health IT Security
12/12/2018

A malware attack against the University of Maryland Medical System's computer system on Sunday is being investigated by hospital system officials. The cyberattack affected around 250 of the 27,000 devices in the health system, but information such as patient data did not appear to be compromised, and patient care was not affected, said CIO Jon Burns.

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The Baltimore Sun
12/12/2018

Two baboons with transplanted hearts from genetically engineered pigs survived for 90 days at Bruno Reichart's lab at Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich before being euthanized, and two other baboons with pig hearts survived 180 days before euthanasia, as required under the study protocol. Non-human primates in prior studies died soon after transplantation, but Reichart soaked the porcine hearts in a nutrient-rich solution and kept them warmer than in previous attempts, which may have prevented ischemia.

12/12/2018

Doris Tsao, one of this year's MacArthur Foundation "genius" grant recipients, worked with macaques to map how the brain processes minute differences in shapes, features, tones and textures to recognize a face. Now she is working to crack the code of how the brain processes the world and is studying not only how the brain processes sensory information but also how the brain links that information to high-level knowledge.

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Nature (free content)
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MacArthur Foundation, MacArthur
12/12/2018

Voters in Mount Horeb, Wis., rejected a proposed resolution that would have expanded an ordinance and blocked the breeding of dogs for biomedical research. The measure may have been the first of its kind, but it is not likely to be the last, and "[t]he scientific community and research advocates can and should play an important role in providing facts and engaging in public dialog to support citizens' informed decisions," write Allyson Bennett and Sangy Panicker.

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Speaking of Research
12/12/2018

Research programs that involve animals need to inform the public and maintain a level of transparency about what they do, but they also need to respond judiciously to inquiries, particularly from activist organizations, writes John Sancenito, president of security consulting firm Information Network Associates, who offers guidelines for balancing transparency and security.

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Laboratory Equipment
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Ina