Industry News
Health IT News
Top stories summarized by our editors
8/3/2020

Research fellow Ananya Malhotra and her colleagues have developed an artificial intelligence program to identify people at high risk for pancreatic cancer based on symptoms previously associated with pancreatic cancer as well as others that occurred frequently in pancreatic cancer patients' health records. The algorithm predicted pancreatic cancer up to 20 months before diagnosis in a pilot study involving people younger than 60, and it could be used to refine screening protocols.

Full Story:
News Medical
8/3/2020

A study of 776 people ages 18 to 91 found stress levels during the first weeks of the novel coronavirus pandemic varied by age, researchers reported in the Journals of Gerontology: Series B. Being a younger adult was associated with being more concerned about the threat of COVID-19, while being an older adult was associated with better emotional well-being and less reactivity to stress factors.

Full Story:
ZME Science
8/3/2020

The economic impact of the novel coronavirus pandemic may be changing how people view their retirement horizon, as the SimplyWise July 2020 Retirement Confidence Index found 72% of people said they plan to work in retirement, compared with 67% in May. Ryan Shuchman of Cornerstone Financial Services in Michigan said the pandemic also has placed more emphasis on online learning, so retirees may want to consider using their professional expertise to tutor or teach online.

Full Story:
Forbes
8/3/2020

Geriatric physicians, aging experts, and industry specialists say the post-COVID-19 world will change for older adults, from how they get health care to how they shop, travel, work, and have relationships. Cleveland Clinic geriatrician Dr. Ronan Factora said more medicine will be performed via telehealth, and Ken Dychtwald, CEO of the think tank Age Wave, said workers ages 60 and older will be more reluctant to work from anywhere but home.

Full Story:
Kaiser Health News
7/31/2020

The CMS said it will use existing evaluation and management codes to reimburse eligible health care providers for counseling patients about the importance of self-isolation after they are tested for COVID-19. The agency also released new payment codes effective Aug. 1 for remdesivir and convalescent plasma that will allow real-time tracking of their use and effectiveness.

7/31/2020

Interoperability and data access rules will give patients more control over their own medical records, and better APIs would have facilitated care and research during the COVID-19 pandemic, says National Coordinator for Health IT Don Rucker. Patients need secure access to their health data, and data collected by location technology, wearable devices and websites must be protected, Rucker says.

Full Story:
GovInfoSecurity
7/31/2020

Public health would benefit, particularly during the pandemic, if Congress required the CDC to aggressively promote state and local data modernization, including mandating the use of the Digital Bridge, according to this piece. The Digital Bridge collaborative says EHRs should be the standard source of real-time data for public health purposes wherever possible and supports HL7 standards.

Full Story:
Health Affairs Blog
7/31/2020

A security vulnerability in Philips' DreamMapper software for sleep apnea could allow someone with little skill to gain access to a log file containing descriptive error messages. Philips says the vulnerability affects versions up to and including 2.24x and does not put patient safety at risk.

7/31/2020

Scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have developed a machine learning approach to predict whether a particular COVID-19 vaccine design would be effective in a segment of the population and have used the platform to design a vaccine now in animal testing. The platform also shows that many of the coronavirus vaccines in the pipeline may not offer broad coverage.

Full Story:
ZDNet
7/31/2020

The Curial AI test, an artificial intelligence program developed at the University of Oxford that analyzes emergency department patient data, could determine a patient's odds of being infected with SARS-CoV-2 about an hour into an ED visit. The app has been tested on data from 115,000 patient visits and has a more than 90% accuracy rate.

Full Story:
The Journal (Dublin)
More Summaries:
University of Oxford

Pages