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4/14/2021

The ADA sent letters on April 13 to Rep. John Garamendi, D-Calif., and to Rep. Mark Pocan, D-Wis., thanking each for introducing legislation that would reduce the burdens of student debt for dentists. HR 1918 would reduce federal student loan interest rates and allow deferral of payments until after residency, among other measures, while provisions in HR 2160 include allowing repeated refinancing of federal student loans at fixed rates, according to ADA News. ADA President Daniel J. Klemmedson, D.D.S., M.D., and Executive Director Kathleen T. O'Loughlin, D.M.D., lauded the bills for their potential to help ease financial burdens on dentists and also possibly to "inspire more highly indebted young dentists to practice in underserved areas."

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ADA News
4/14/2021

Dentists say teeth grinding and clenching, which are common and sometimes unnoticed effects of stress, are becoming more prevalent amid the COVID-19 pandemic, and a recent ADA survey found that 70% of dentists have seen an increase in these cases, WCBS-TV/WLNY-TV of New York City reports. James Abjanich, D.D.S., says the trend could be considered an epidemic itself, noting that he has seen chipped teeth, fractures, temporomandibular issues, pain and mobility problems.

4/14/2021

The Dental Quality Alliance 2021 Virtual Conference is a live digital event, May 19-21, exploring the disruptive forces in the health care system and their impact on oral health care. Register now.

The Dental Quality Alliance is convened by the ADA at the request of the CMS, bringing together major stakeholders in oral health care delivery to collaboratively develop oral health care measures.

Learn more about the DQA.

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ada.org
4/14/2021

This free white paper from Fuse, a Patterson technology, reinforces that what goes on behind the scenes of a practice is just as important as what happens in the operatory and the reception area. This practical reference shows you how cloud-based practice management solutions can enable time-efficient, practical approaches for managing a modern dental practice.
Sponsored by Fuse

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pages.ada.org
4/14/2021

Radiologists should be aware of liabilities when using artificial intelligence tools in medical imaging such as general negligence and informed consent, researchers wrote in Skeletal Radiology. Imaging practices must have written protocols in the event that a radiologist makes a mistake, and developers may also be held liable for these mistakes. "They can be aided by ACR and [Society of Skeletal Radiology]-validated guidelines, training programs, and model practices for deploying AI technologies," researchers wrote.

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Health Imaging
4/14/2021

More than 192 million doses of COVID-19 vaccine had been administered in the US as of Tuesday, with 75.3 million people now fully vaccinated, the CDC reports. After US health agencies recommended that use of a vaccine made by Johnson & Johnson be paused after six reported incidents of blood clotting after vaccination, White House COVID-19 coordinator Jeff Zients said the country has "more than enough supply" of vaccines made by Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna to maintain the current pace of vaccination.

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Reuters, Reuters
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White House, White House
4/14/2021

This new resource, A Dentist's Guide to the Law: 246 Things Every Dentist Should Know, helps you better understand the legal issues you may face, avoid certain legal problems and know the kinds of questions you should ask your own attorney if a legal problem arises.

To order, visit ADAcatalog.org or call 800.947.4746. Save 15% by using promo code 21517 by 4.30.2021.

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ebusiness.ada.org
4/14/2021

House lawmakers voted 384-38 to pass a bill that would delay 2% Medicare payment cuts for health care providers until year-end. The legislation now heads to President Joe Biden for his expected signature.

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The Hill
4/14/2021

A study in Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics found that the prevalence of COVID-19 antibodies was generally similar among individuals in Colorado, whether or not they have type 1 diabetes. However, the findings revealed that there was a slightly higher prevalence of COVID-19 antibodies among people with established type 1 diabetes, compared with those with new onset of the disease, which could be due to "the older age of these individuals or diabetes being a potential risk factor for COVID-19 disease," the researchers say.

4/14/2021

Adults with type 1 diabetes tend to leave their jobs at a younger age, which results in greater mean lost working years and mean lost productivity costs, compared with those with type 2 diabetes, according to a study in Diabetologia. The findings also revealed that all complications due to diabetes -- aside from eye-related complications and regardless of the type of diabetes -- were tied to a higher risk of early job exit, compared with those who didn't suffer diabetes complications.

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Medical Dialogues