News for Providers
Top stories summarized by our editors
9/23/2019

Experts say mental health apps that share data with a third party could exacerbate health issues due to targeted advertising and may put patient privacy at risk. The Crisis Text Line, for example, is using algorithms that analyze chats for certain words, and those kinds of algorithms are being employed at its sister company to help corporations boost worker communication.

9/23/2019

Northern Botswana's Ngamiland region is home to 300,000 cows and crisscrossed by a network of fences that were erected largely to manage risk of foot-and-mouth disease, but a new model known as commodity-based trade could enable that risk to be managed without fences. Taking the barriers down would enable wildlife to move more freely, relieving the growing challenge of elephant-human conflict, writes Cornell University wildlife veterinarian Steve Osofsky, along with creating economic benefits.

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Cornell University
9/23/2019

A study in Obesity Medicine showed a significant association between the hepatic enzymes alanine transaminase, albumin and aspartate transaminase and poorly controlled type 2 diabetes. Based on data for 453 people with diabetes, abnormal hepatic levels were significantly correlated with lipid profiles, an indication that "high ALT is characteristic of [patients with T2D] ... pointing to the fact that the development of hepatic anomalies with poor glycemic control attendants could indicate unfavorable evolution of [T2D]," the study team wrote.

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Endocrinology Advisor
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diabetes
9/23/2019

Researchers found that children with obesity who received probiotic supplements had significantly greater weight reduction and improved metabolic health, compared with those who weren't given probiotics. The findings, presented at the European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology's annual meeting, suggest the viability of probiotic supplementation in preventing and treating pediatric obesity but more studies are still needed, said researcher Rui-Min Chen.

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Obesity
9/23/2019

A study published in Arthritis & Rheumatology revealed that individuals with overweight or obesity who consumed an unhealthy diet and drank alcohol were at an increased risk of developing hyperuricemia, a precursor to gout. Based on 14,624 US adults, researchers also found that 12% of hyperuricemia cases were attributable to diuretic use.

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Reuters
9/23/2019

A recommendation backing a label update for Eli Lilly's Trulicity, or dulaglutide, was made by the European Medicines Agency's Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use based on positive results from the REWIND trial. The updated label should include the drug's cardiovascular benefits in the instructions for its use.

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Eli Lilly
9/23/2019

An EY report pegged revenue growth for the medical technology industry at 7% last year for a record $407 billion, but an 11% increase in research and development spending to $15 billion did not match the $17 billion companies returned to investors in buybacks and dividends. "With medtech's future dependent on innovation, this strategy may please shareholders in the short term, but has long-term potential downside," the report said.

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Forbes
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medtech
9/23/2019

Humana CEO Bruce Broussard said capping drug prices may help reduce health costs, but legislation should include rules to promote more competition. "I really want to encourage competition because I think competition creates innovation, and when you create innovation everyone wins," Broussard said.

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CNBC
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Bruce Broussard, Humana
9/23/2019

The FDA should immediately halt sales of all cartridge- and pod-based e-cigarette products until they are shown to be safe, according to a letter sent by a bipartisan group of senators to acting FDA Commissioner Ned Sharpless. The FDA should also not include exemptions for mint- and menthol-flavored e-cigarettes in upcoming action that is expected to ban flavored e-cigarettes, said Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi, D-Ill.

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Reuters
9/23/2019

Canadian researchers who used PET with the radiotracer F-18 FEPPA found that individuals who used cannabis and those with cannabis use disorder had 23.3% and 31.5% higher brain 18-kDa translocator protein levels, respectively, indicating increased neuroimmune activation, compared with those who didn't use cannabis, with elevated TSPO levels associated with increased C-reactive protein levels, anxiety and chronic stress. The findings in JAMA Psychiatry suggest a link between long-term cannabinoid exposure and cannabis use disorder-related behavioral and cognitive impairments, researchers wrote.

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cannabis