Industry News
News for Providers
Top stories summarized by our editors
9/23/2020

A study in Radiology Case Reports describes a 40-year-old woman with colitis whose stomach and pelvic CT scan showed ascending colon and caecum mucosal enhancement and mural thickening, as well as bilateral ground-glass opacities and other COVID-19-related features in the base of the lungs. The patient was later confirmed to have COVID-19, and her imaging findings were resolved two weeks after receiving COVID-19 treatment. The findings should prompt radiologists to be aware of COVID-19-related gastrointestinal symptoms to avoid missed diagnoses, researchers wrote.

Full Story:
Radiology Business
9/23/2020

The CMS' provision of new technology add-on payment status for a radiology artificial intelligence algorithm signifies recognition of the value of medical imaging AI software in patient care and may lead to reimbursement for other radiology AI applications, says Dr. Eliot Siegel of the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Michael Cannavo of Image Management Consultants says the radiology AI market is poised to grow due to CMS reimbursement.

9/23/2020

Domestic swine might be susceptible to SARS-CoV-2, according to a study posted before peer review on the preprint server bioRxiv by scientists at Iowa State University, the University of Manitoba and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. However, another study by researchers at Kansas State University confirmed prior studies showing that pigs are not susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection. The breeds and ages of the pigs in the different studies could be factors in susceptibility, as could the dosage, and both research teams say more studies are needed.

9/23/2020

A startup established by Australia's scientific research agency is developing a bovine dietary supplement from asparagopsis that scientists say reduces methane emissions. Bromoform in the seaweed prevents the production of gas as cows digest their food, and another startup based on the East coast of Tasmania is farming high-bromoform asparagopsis in the ocean and on land.

Full Story:
CNN
9/23/2020

A study in BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care found that type 2 diabetes patients who were evening chronotypes -- or those who go to sleep and wake up later -- were more likely to have higher sedentary time and lower levels of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, both of which put their health at greater risk, compared with those who were morning chronotypes. Lead researcher Joseph Henson also said evening chronotypes exercise 56% less than their morning counterparts.

Full Story:
Medical Dialogues
9/23/2020

Johnson & Johnson launched Phase III of a clinical trial on a single-dose COVID-19 vaccine and expects to report results by the end of the year, according to chief scientific officer Paul Stoffels. The company also posted a detailed clinical trial protocol on its website.

Full Story:
Reuters
9/23/2020

Type 2 diabetes patients who underwent once-weekly treatment with insulin icodec experienced a decrease in A1C level similar to patients who took once-daily insulin glargine U100, according to findings from a phase 2 trial presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes annual virtual meeting and published in The New England Journal of Medicine. The once-weekly treatment with insulin icodec could potentially "improve treatment acceptance and likely would facilitate management in type 2 diabetes patients needing basal insulin," said study author Julio Rosenstock.

9/23/2020

A study presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes annual virtual meeting found that type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients have 33% and 19% higher risk of falls, respectively, compared with the general population. Type 2 diabetes patients also had a higher risk of fractures at the hip and femur, humerus, radius, and skull or face, while type 1 diabetes patients had higher risk of fractures only at the hip and femoral region, compared with the general population, the study found.

Full Story:
Medical Dialogues
9/23/2020

Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation head Brad Smith said newer value-based care payment models based on a global budget have shown success, while others, such as those with bundled payments, have led to a lot of transformation but failed to show expected quality or savings improvements. Smith said some of the successful models had a "clear thesis" about quality and cost improvements.

Full Story:
FierceHealthcare
9/23/2020

Scripps Health used "supersite" health centers to help manage the transition of patient care from inpatient to outpatient settings, according to co-Chief Medical Officer Dr. Anil Keswani. Scripps also promoted more home care over using hospitals or ambulatory centers, and created a digital strategy that includes remote patient monitoring.

Full Story:
HealthLeaders Media
More Summaries:
Scripps, Scripps Health